Dave Trott's mischievous seeding of Creative Mischief

Image of Creative Mischief

Those who follow @Davetrott on twitter can't help but notice that he retweets anyone who speaks of his new book: Creative Mischief. It might be borderline spammy but it's often funny. People take friendly jabs at Dave, @ASheldrick (Andrew Sheldrick) just tweeted "@davetrott Like the bloody opera singer and eastern European mongooses, your incessant Creative Mischief plugs have worked. Well played sir."

Want to have a peek inside the book to see if you should pick it up? Adland is here to serve!

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AdLook: Lets judge women in advertising on how hot they look - not how hot their work is.

Only in the Ukraine could we have an award like Adlook, where the 'muses' in advertising aren't judged by the hotness of their work, but by how hot they look in heels and a push-up bra. Unlike in the miss Universe competition, here silicone is A-OK!
Seriously, they say this in their opening paragraph.

Adlook – is the first rating, where ad agencies take their places not for their works, but for beautiful looks of their female co-workers. So the rating of your agency depends on you, girls. Clients and their budgets have no importance here. There’s no place for fakes here (though adlook team thinks that silicone is ok).

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Ad Chat - Gideon Amichay

Gideon and fan Liat in Cannes this summer

This week we put Gideon Amichay, Creative Chairman of Shalmor Avnon Amichay Y&R Tel Aviv in our spotlight. You can find his blog at gideonamichay.com, and if you're lucky you'll pass him on the Croisette in Cannes as he cruises along eating ice-cream and he'll high-five you as you walk past each other (I am that kind of lucky, that was funny Gideon).

What's your favorite funny story about yourself?
My first career was as a cartoonist.

What piece of art (movie, book, music, painting, etc) has influenced you most? How or why?
The Fountainhead, the book and the movie. The book is about believing in your way and follow it till the end.

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Björn loves John, plays vertical tennis live on billboard. Adidas & TBWA Japan did vertical football 2004.

It was a lovely sunny day this Saturday, and on the outside wall of the famous department store NK in Stockholm, Björn Borg met John McEnroe for a game of vertical tennis.

Except they were stuntmen, of course. "We couldn't convince the original players to do a re-match on the wall" said Pernilla Johansson, global PR-&-Event at Björn Borg, to Resume.se.

Badland: 
 

Heise creates "two-click" Facebook like button to avoid traffic tracking. Facebook peeved.

Zdnet reports that German website Heise has created a two-click facebook "like" button. You have to 'slide' the button on before you can click it to like on Facebook, only then will all the facebook tracking scripts be loaded into the page.

In short: if you don’t click anything, Facebook can’t track your visit to Heise.

Unsurprisingly, Facebook didn’t like this change. A spokesperson told the German publication that the way it has implemented the Facebook Like button violates the Facebook Platform Policies, specifically quoting this clause:

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Christian billboard campaign threatens to kill you if you don't believe in God

Fine, so the headline might be a tad hyperbolic, but how do you interpret the billboard currently running in Texas? The headline reads: "If God doesn't matter to him, do you?" and shows a young boy holding a gun aimed straight at the viewer.

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The stuff we missed: Fluid hair defends 'abuse ad' with "I was abused" - links & more

Bat boy wins a tomorrow award. He won't if you beat him to it, remember deadline is October 3rd, if you've created something that points to the future of advertising, get on it. It's not about media, it's about groundbreaking ideas.

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Googles Doodles - now a patented idea.

Reading at Creative Review: Why Google has oodles of doodles a paragraph jumps out at me and tries to stab me.

In March of this year, the US Patent and Trademark office granted Google a patent for its doodles but, surprisingly, that patent does not cover the individual doodle designs, instead, it relates to the invention of the idea and method of periodically changing the logo to entice people to the website. You might wonder how a company could be granted exclusive rights to the concept of frequently varying its logo, but that seems to be what has happened.

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