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American airlines reveal their new logo, the flag gets bigger, the eagle more stylistic

The new American Airlines logo revealed in a film here that looks back at AA history and logos too, is a clean crisp update withe the eagle intact but abstract. The tail of American Airline planes look decidedly patriotic as they are drenched in the red white & blue stripes.

So while the logo update may be the most modern facelift they ever had, will it be able to yank AMerican Airlines away from the bankruptcy protection they are in?

The unions are not impressed, as a spokesperson for the Allied Pilots Association told the Chicago tribune

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Wrangler creates jeans that fight cellulite? Jeanius!

Gizmode reports that you'll get around 95 wears out of these magic jeans that can moisturize your legs with Aloe Vera, Olive extract or the "Smooth legs" version with caffeine, retinol, and algae extract that can help you fight cellulite. Brilliant! I predict they won't be able to keep these on the shelves. The jeans are due to be released in Wranglers "Denim Spa line", and will be available online at the end of the month.

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LOGAN East Hires EP Dan Sormani and CD/Director Alan Bibby

LOGAN East is proud to announce the addition of Executive Producer Dan Sormani and multi-talented CD/Director Alan Bibby to its roster. Based out of the newly designed 7,000 sq. ft. office space in Soho, they will lead the East Coast division of the company.

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The Atlantic apologizes for running a Scientology sponsored content ad.

If you were asleep or god forbid, not on social media yesterday, you might have missed a whopper of a story. The Atlantic posted an advertorial on Scientology. Paid for, obviously, by The Church of Scientology. And then apologized and took it down.

Why did they apologize, you ask?

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Treehouse Adds Editor Jayson Limmer

DALLAS—Continuing to grow its creative staff, Dallas editorial boutique Treehouse has hired editor Jayson Limmer. Formerly with 3008, Limmer arrives with more than eight years of experience in cutting spots for agencies in Dallas and other markets, and credits that include such brands as Charter, Western Union, Gamestop, Red Lobster, HEB and Zales. In his first project for Treehouse, Limmer is editing a new campaign for Pennsylvania-based convenience store chain Wawa and Dallas agency The Richards Group.

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Social media usage changes with age.

As we grow older, our social media usage shifts. This may not sound like huge news, but it is of note to anyone in the industry looking to reach people. Especially people in that holy grail demographic: the kids.

The kids are moving away from Facebook slightly and spending more time on Tumbr where they aren't bombarded by ads, photos of abandoned dogs, and endless babies.

In a recent survey conducted by Survata, a consumer insights start-up, the 13-18 year olds shows 61% are using Tumblr, compared to Facebook's 55%. Small drop in the bucket, perhaps. But once we survey the 19-25 crowd, their usage is even lower.

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Beefeater 24 special introduces Studio24 an instagram last.fm mashup

The creative team Jason Moussalli and Adam Balogh at Publicis London have created this instagram/last.fm mashup. Introducing Studio24, it's a bit like Studio54 except not legendary nor full of legends, or even a physical place. It's a mashup between your instagram photos and your last.fm playing habits that you can share with your friends as a snapshot of the soundtrack to last weekend, or rallying cry to do it all again sometime. Check it at beefeaterstudio24.com

What does this have to do with gin? What makes Beefeater 24 special? Time. It takes 24 hours to steep its botanicals. 24 hours, Studios24, ah you see the connection now don't you?

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Youtube and Google have money problems

The Guardian has an interesting article in which it explains, kind of, sort of, Google/Youtube's attempts to help record labels make money off their illicit versions of their songs.

Anyone who has ever tried to get unauthorised versions and videos of their music off YouTube knows that filing takedown notices is like playing Whac-a-Mole, as new versions pop up almost immediately. But now, with YouTube's ad partnerships, record labels are discovering a better solution: monetising them.

Note I wrote record labels, not the musicians themselves.

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