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Digital State

What is the Digital State?
What is our Digital State of Mind?
What does the Digital State mean for brands and for businesses?

These are the questions Simon Pont looked to answer by bringing experts from advertising, marketing, media, publishing, law and finance together. The result is a collection of 16 essays touching on personal and professional ways digital is transforming our lives, our culture, and our industry.

My favorite sections from the book include:

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What kind of a tool are you? from The practical pocket guide to account planning.

Ever felt like your office is full of tools? Ever wondered if you were one? Ever wanted to get less tooly and better at planning? Look, there's lots of advertising books out there, and they're usually for creatives, unless they're all account all the time. Very few books are bite-sized planning advice, approved by creatives. In fact, I think there's just one, and this one is it.

Look, you can only get so far with a fake British accent. You better pick this book up if you're interested in planning or just want a refresher reminder on how it should really be™. Or maybe, just maybe pick it up because you're an eternally curious person, and you really want to know what a planner does.

Prologue:


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Shocker: Copywriter writes book ... set in advertising.

Like the novel "E" by Matt Beaumont this fictional book is set in the advertising business, but "Truth in advertising" also deals with some serious issues.

Finbar Dolan is lost and lonely, had feet so cold he called off a wedding, and now has to call off his vacation to write and edit a super bowl spot about diapers in record time. Then things get worse. His once abusive father falls ill, his siblings do not intend to visit, and just what in the hell is Finbar really doing with his life? Shilling diapers!

This is not the trailer for the book.

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Bob's book about Bill and the other ad men during the creative revolution

In A History of Advertising That Changed the History of Advertising Bob Levenson will show you that the simple rules: "Tell the truth", "Make it interesting" and to top it off "show it in a different way" is all you really need to make a great ad.

You don't have to be Jewish to love Levy's. What idiot changed the Chivas Regal bottle again? Lemon. Think small.

This illustration:

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The ultime ad-crib book, Joelapompe's 100 Visual Ideas, 1000 Great Ads

This is a book you need to stuff in every xmas christmas stocking that belongs to an adgrunt or a student of advertising. It does just what it says on the tin, it'll show you one hundred visual ideas and one thousand (often great) ads. Like Nouveau? Or not, Joe La Pompe's previous book, and his website, this book is full of twin ads. Triplets, quadruplets and octuplets too. But only in a slight visual common note, the ideas differ. Like when The Economist and Gametek had the same windshield-viper visual but said two very different things.

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Advertising Concept Book - buy one for every one of your clients.

I have one reason you should get this book.

The entire book looks like a comp. All illustrations are rough sketches of the ads that they are talking about.

Genius.

Because the point of the book is concept now, design later. You should make roughs and tissue paper and sketches and whatever you may call it, as many as you can, as simple as you can to explain your idea. When you have it, the idea that scrawny little sketch jumps out at you and the designing can begin.

Put that mouse down, leave the wacom tablet alone. Take your time to look through this solid, informative and fun read. Giggle at each comp that you instantly recognize the ad in. Learn the lesson: have the concept before the computer.

Honestly, every client out there should have this book.

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101 Contrarian Ideas About Advertising

If you read the Ad Contrarian, then you know what this book is like. He runs against the grain, he rants on making his points, he'll have you laughing at the hype and he hates pretty much everything that is hyped. Fans love this, love him, and even those who don't agree with him check the blog because it's darn-tooting refreshing looking at the latest glass of Kool-aid from the angle of someone who didn't drink it.

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Dave Trott's mischievous seeding of Creative Mischief

Those who follow @Davetrott on twitter can't help but notice that he retweets anyone who speaks of his new book: Creative Mischief. It might be borderline spammy but it's often funny. People take friendly jabs at Dave, @ASheldrick (Andrew Sheldrick) just tweeted "@davetrott Like the bloody opera singer and eastern European mongooses, your incessant Creative Mischief plugs have worked. Well played sir."

Want to have a peek inside the book to see if you should pick it up? Adland is here to serve!

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George Parker writes another book: Confessions of a Mad Man.

George Parker, our favorite crusty curmudgeon behind adscam, has written another book. Writing Madscam (Kindle version) and The Ubiquitous Persuaders wasn't enough, George still has a lot on his mind. He needs to confess. What could he have to confess about that you haven't read in his blog already? Dearie me, lots. Below is a sample from chapter 2, where George reveals he worked on Mr Whipple! (Now I wan't to see George and Luke thumbwrestle over a wee dram.)

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Luke Sullivan's childhood had insanity, addiction, and Rock 'n' Roll

Most of us weren't blessed with a perfect childhood. Some of us developed self-defense gallows humor as defense, and Luke Sullivan is one of them. He explains:

I often describe the books story as “The Shining, but … funnier.” It's the story of growing up with my five brothers in a big house in Minnesota back in the days of Eisenhower and Kennedy. Yet even with winters raging outside and our father raging within, our mother's protection allowed us to have a wildly fun, thoroughly dysfunctional time growing up.

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