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Luke Sullivan's childhood had insanity, addiction, and Rock 'n' Roll

Most of us weren't blessed with a perfect childhood. Some of us developed self-defense gallows humor as defense, and Luke Sullivan is one of them. He explains:

I often describe the books story as “The Shining, but … funnier.” It's the story of growing up with my five brothers in a big house in Minnesota back in the days of Eisenhower and Kennedy. Yet even with winters raging outside and our father raging within, our mother's protection allowed us to have a wildly fun, thoroughly dysfunctional time growing up.

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The Idea Writers: Copywriting in a New Media and Marketing Era

Teressa Iezzi, I have a problem with this book.

I have a problem with the title.

The idea that only "Copywriters" are the ones that make the ideas is assbackwards, and was never true.

Apart from the title, everything else in the book is correct. The traditional team hasn't really been working since the mid 90s, so that revelation isn't new at all, but it also shows us that the traditional "ads" with headline, tagline and slogan are dead. We write TV shows. We are creating a mobile apps. We're doing an interactive installation. We're making ten thousand jokes to be dispersed on a twitter account. We're writing TV scripts. We're writing long format films for household brands.

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Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard

If you enjoyed Made To Stick, with its lively writing style and anecdata way of explaining things, you might want to pick up this one as well. Change don't come easy, people hate change, change is hard. The only difference between a rut and a grave is the depth. If you need to change something, anything, from how your office deals with time-sheets to your entire life, reading this is a good place to start.

Because why, really, is it so hard to change?

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Ad Nauseam: the back to school book for budding ad-cynics.

Thanks to Carrie McLaren I got myself a copy of the Survivor's Guide to American Consumer Culture as seen here on the left, posing on a pile of sick bags with genuine falafal fat stains on it. (Yes, I have collected several hundred sick bags, if you haven't noticed by now, all signs point to me being a packrat on my way to rivaling the Collyer brothers)

If you have been an avid reader of StayFree magazine like myself, don't worry there's fresh data in here to feast on mixed in with some of their best articles. If you've never read StayFree magazine, it's a bit like adbusters. Sure the authors bemoan the advertising seeping into every pore of our culture, but at the same time they are fascinated by it, armed with wit and plenty of research. Those who have followed adland for as long as I have written it will find ad creep and other phenomena as familiar faces in here, all helping to paint a bigger picture of what advertising and consumer culture is doing to our society as a whole. The whole book is funny, subversive and eye-opening - if you've had them closed that is.

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Nouveau? Or not. The book from french Badland-King Joe la pompe

Joe La Pompe, the anonymous French guy who has been publishing twin ads on the web for almost as long as I have been Badlanding ads, has published a book. Alas, it's in French. But even if you don't know French, you can enjoy the ad twins anyway.

Since I can't really read French, not properly anyway, I figured that my review of the book should not be a written one. Here's my chat on Badlanders in general, and how to avoid them.

My neat little automagick link to Amazon widget is not built for french Amazon and I'm forced to link a US-available related book just to make this post work, here is a hardcoded link to the Joe La Pompe book that I'm actually talking about: Nouveau ? (Broché)

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Adland: Searching for the Meaning of Life on a Branded Planet

"With a unique blend of humor and insight, Othmer guides us through this rapidly changing business and lets us see the direction in which it is headed. A must read for any student of advertising."
-- Rick Boyko, Director, VCU Brandcenter

"Advertising is an industry like any other, except it changes our planet daily. James Othmer, one of my favorite writers, takes you inside that world and makes the people and places real. You can dislike these guys, but you can't ignore them. They make sure of that."
  --Seth Godin, author, TRIBES

"I've been in advertising more than twenty years and spent countless hours trying to tell people how insane and hilarious and exciting and pointless and fascinating it all is. Now all I have to do is hand them this book."
-Jamie Barrett,
Creative Director/Partner Goodby Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco

"Othmer's struggle to do the next right thing in a business predicated on greed, lust, envy and sloth makes for an enlightening
as well as entertaining read."
                                                                    -Steffan Postaer
                                                                    Chairman & Chief Creative Officer, 
                                                                    Euro RSCG Chicago

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Dabitch wants the ABCD3D book for Xmas!

I want this book pretty dang bad, ABC3D is as much a work of art as it is a pop-up book - each letter moves and some turn into other letters when you manipulate them, like C which turns into D with a snap. Bring your budding typographer up right, have them practice their ABC's with this book. Or simply treat your inner child to a brilliantly (and stylishly) executed book idea.

Marion Bataille is graphic and book designer who lives in Paris. The footage shows a hand-made mock-up of the actual book which will be published 14th Oct. 2008. In stores soon, folks! (You can pre-order at Amazon if you, like me, can't wait!)

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Jonathan Salem Baskin - Why did you write "Branding only works on cattle?"

I haven't read the book yet, hence it's unrated (if you have read it feel free to share your views). But I did have the opportunity to ask Jonathan Salem Baskin Why did you write "Branding only works on cattle"? the start of a whole new conversation about branding. He replied:

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Alex White - "Advertising design and typography" - the new bible book for budding designers.

When I first spotted this book, I thought I had died and gone to heaven. I'm a total sucker for those heavy hard cover tomes of design that you can read cover to cover and then flip through over and over and over again. This is exactly that kind of book, it's jam packed with over 1,500 advertising examples that reinforce the message Alex is trying to get across.

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Hey Whipple, one more time! The third edition of Luke Sullivan's guide to creating great advertising

A lot has changed since the first edition of the now staple creative diet book "Hey Whipple, Squeeze This", not just that Dick Wilson who played Mr Whipple has gone to squeeze the big fluffy clouds in the sky at the grand age of 91. There's also the galloping development of the web and the myriad of new media areas. So how does the grand old classic "idea" apply to these new solutions? Don't worry, Luke knows.

“Luke Sullivan writes just about as relevant an advertising read as you can get. It’s a perfect lesson in advertising for newcomers – and a familiar and highly painful reminiscence for those of us entrenched in this noble and often crazy profession.”
–Lee Clow, Chairman, TBWA/Chiat, Chief Creative Officer Worldwide
“This is a business that is changing like crazy, but Sullivan’s advice is timeless.”
–Mike Hughes, President, Creative Director, The Martin Agency
“Luke’s reflections on the advertising industry make me wish I could do it all over again. Except for that ‘scab’ story in Chapter 10.”
–Bob Barrie, Barrie D’Rozario Murphy

Lets do an excerpt. My favorite way to check out a book is to slap it open and read a bit. If I fancy it, I buy it. The third edition of this book doesn't just have two new chapters but old chapters have been updated as well as the examples were getting a little dusty. Check out chapter eight inside for your test read.

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