Because I am in a smartarse mood today, I'd just like to point out that Uncle Sam's "wants you" recruitment poster is totally a badlander as "Lord Kitchener Wants You" was the UK's call to personal action already back in 1914.

The "pointing at the viewer" guilt trip of the Lord Kitchener poster can be seen echoed in many more posters that came after it. Examples; Smokey the bear, Soviet Union poster by Dmitry Moor, 1941. A United States, World War I poster in Yiddish: "Your Old New Land must have you! Join the Jewish regiment". A British World War I recruiting poster with John Bull asking "Who's Absent? Is it YOU?" in 1915. A Reichswehr recruitment poster by Julius Ussy Engelhard, 1919. "You too must join Reichswehr". And so on. You, dear punter, are wanted as canon-fodder,

Badland: 

See, we already Badlanded it once in "wi-fi idea ripe for picking at least twice." Yes, it's the name-your-wifi-something-to-advertise-something idea, and as predicted this is now so mature that the wifi itself is a media.

The Coffee company nudged customers to try a muffin, or "buy another coffee already" with their execution (top image) in 2008, while GermanWings led people via their free wifi (named after offers) to pages with those offers (also in 2008).

Adland: 
Badland: 

Do you remember the Domestic Violence PSA - Coalition Against Battered Women: "It rarely stops" from Y&R in 2010? Yeah it was a bit like that Macy Grey video from the 90s, where the bruises appeared and vanished from her face, but here our abused heroine wasn't singing about the past. She was busy covering each mark, cut and brusies with makeup, while new ones kept appearing, which made the point of the ad : "It rarely stops".

Adland: 
Badland: 

There's a new ad out, where the Delite-o-magic vending machine challenges people to press the button 100 times, bow down and kneel before it, jump on one leg and dance like a maniac, just to get a free pack of Delites. Forget that "How far will people go for the taste of Fantastic Delites?" sounds a lot like "What would you do for a Klondyke bar" for a second, and forget that it would take five hours to push the button five-thousand times, lets look at the vending machine part of this idea shall we?

Adland: 
Badland: 

Back in 1999, there was - according to all rumors - quite the dramatic pitch for the überhot account of Adidas. W+K Amsterdam was involved, and from the ashes of that pitch was born a brand new agency: 180. Would they show off good once they showed some work? Yes, they would. This Adidas ad blew most people away back then, and was ripped off a few times (some Dutch bank copy was in an early Badlander here). I personally applauded it for being my go-to whenever I needed to show a client that YES you do not to speak the VO when it's written on the screen already, gosh darnit.

Adland: 
Badland: 

I feel for my old co-workers at Oriflame for being slapped with this ad-bannage. First off, Oriflame is a bit like Avon in that there are troops of independent salespeople, and they are all armed with the all powerful catalogue. This catalogue is distributed to 38 different countries and 3.5 million consultants.
There's a silly amount of meetings discussing every detail of a layout where top execs from several different countries will offer their invaluable input such as "we need more glamour, can you print glitter?" and "She needs to smile more" followed by "No, smiles don't sell in my country" followed by "In my country she needs to smile like Mona Lisa" and so on.
Provided you haven't turned skitzo during one of these many meetings you will soon enough (read: six months) have a layout that has turned into a mishmash of details and additions much like that "if microsoft designed Apple packaging" video. Despite all that, you manage to produce something... And then the Swedish Reklamombudsman bans it because the girls looks like a ballerina-girl and the boy looks like a tool-loving boy.. It's enough to drive an art director to drinking the kid-bodywash advertised.

Badland: 

Newsweek is getting a lot of press for the cover "The first gay president", illustrated by Obama wearing a rainbow (neon?) halo above his head. He is getting this title for his "bullshit gay marriage announcement" as Gawker put it. As I recall in September last year Barack Obama was the first Jewish president, as depicted on the cover on New York Magazine, so I'm only here to point out the Badlander-like issue. If I see Barack Obama as the first woman president on a magazine cover near you soon, I'll personally slap the creative who designed that cover with a wet trout. I bet Obama will be wearing lipstick too.

Badland: 
Ted Kaczynski,

The Seventh International Conference on Climate Change have already pulled their billboards in Chicago, less than 24 hours after they went up. The billboards showed Ted Kaczynski, the infamous Unabomber, Charles Manson, a mass murderer, Fidel Castro and other global warming alarmists including Osama bin Laden and James J. Lee, linking belief in global warming to being a mass-murdering certified psycho-nutter. Beacuse you know, those things are totally the same.

Badland: 

Here's an update on those popchips ads we posted earlier this week. Gawker pondered if "racism sells?", since Asthon Kutcher put on a brownface when he played "Raj the Bollywood producer" in the popchips world wide lovers campaign. After Gawker wrote about it, so did Anil Dash and the ad has now been pulled off the intarwebs by the Popchips company. Quoting Gawker here who seem to have the same issue I have with these ads, they just plain ain't funny.

Following a thoughtful piece by Anil Dash criticizing Popchips usage of brownface in their latest ad campaign, the company's founder, Keith Belling, apologized "to anyone we offended," and promptly pulled the ad. Snippets of "Raj" still remain in this composite ad, but it too will likely be removed shortly and revised.

Adland: 
Badland: