Ambient & Guerrilla

 

Ambient or Guerilla ads

 

Verizon - the latest brand to go on a road trip

At the beginning of this month, Verizon launched a new campaign by Draft New York which uses the theme of three documentary filmmakers on a "road trip" asking people around the USA why they chose Verizon. Six TV ads and five radio spots cover the gamut of services offered by Verizon. In addition they've set up a microsite here.

Ad type: 
 

Marching for meat - part two!

Hah! Here's an odd brainsync - hot on the heels of that Svea Kebab demonstration in Sweden come the meatylicious march.
Colman's are organising the World's biggest ever virtual march, to celebrate meat in all its rump-slapping gorgeousness.

Ad type: 
 

Ad students clever ploy for free media: a demonstration

With all the ad creep going on, it was bound to happen, the next generation of ad men and women are outdoing themselves in order to get attention.Resume reports that students from Stockholms school of advertising Bergs have 'invented' a new free media for advertising - the legal right to demonstrate. Calling themselves the "Berghs Embassy of Communication" they applied for the right to demonstrate and then pranced around Stockholm - with a police escort - to holler "No mess, Svea Kebab" and "we only sell what we eat - Svea Kebab!".
The police stopped traffic on several major roads in Stockholm, Sveavägen, Hamngatan and Kungsgatan, just to let the "demonstrators" through. Svea Kebab's owner Mustafa Bakirdan is of course very pleased with the attention they got.

Ad type: 
 

The O.C. World on Latin American beaches

A guerrilla campaign for 3# season of The O.C series, created by Brazilian guerrilla agency Espalhe.

In Latin America, on selected beaches in Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela and Mexico, people had been surprised by ambulants that were selling Italian eyeglasses, Russian caviar, French champagne and diamond necklaces instead of the usual 1$ plastic trinkets.

Each product costs about U$ 300, just to provide to the fans a little of the luxury shown in the series. Some photos here at blogdeguerrilha.com.br.

Ad type: 
 

Apple adds ads to iTunes

Apple adds ads to itunes, say that ten times fast!
Yup, the AdAge article "Apple Chomps Into Forbidden Fruit: Ads" explains that Apple is contemplating for the ads to appear only in the lower-left corner of the iTunes library while users listen to podcasts from their computers rather than from portable devices. This makes me laugh - who on earth watches their iTunes while listening to podcasts? Can we see a show of hands? Anybody? Bueller? I thought not.
I hope that the ad revenue is shared with the content creators, the podcaster be they famous or joe-average. Must be, right?

Ad type: 
 

Earth Day Advertising and Marketing

Well, it's Earth Day. So here's a quickie post of some promotions, marketing initiatives and advertising going on in honor of the day.

Starbucks in Canada will be giving away free coffee if you bring in your own mug today.

Owens Corning, makers of insulation products, promotes their mascot, the Pink Panther, to CEO and gives him a blog about engery efficiency. (funny bit at the end of the press release-"The color PINK is a registered trademark of Owens Corning".)

The International Fund for Animal Welfare is launching a new campaign to protect endangered whales, that will include TV spots and billboards.

GM is running special advertising to drive people to the Live Green Go Yellow site to promote their E85 alternative fuel campaign, as well as participating in events and activities around the US.

Ad type: 
Head&Shoulders escalator
 

Head & Shoulders - Easy to Comb / Escalator ad - Argentina

Leo Burnett, Argentina demonstrate - with an escalator - how easy your hair is to comb after using Head&Shoulders. Okay. That's pretty cute. Bonus trivia: In Argentina an escalator is called escalera.

Ad type: 
Commercials: 
 

Adicolor goes global

Idealogue created an idea for podcast commercials for adicolor. Seven color-themed films in total will each be directed by well-known directors. The first film released was White, (r255g255b255) in which Jenna Jameson bashed the crap out of a Whack-A-Mole machine. It was directed by Tronic. This past week the second film Green (r006g146b071) was released, directed by Happy, which tells the tale of the Finkles and the Gladstones celebration the end of the nuclear winter.

The remaining directors include: Neill Blomkamp, Roman Coppola & Andy Bruntel, Psyop, Saiman Chow, and Charlie White. The rest of the flims have the following release dates: Pink (r243g197b208), April 12; Blue (r023g075b158), April 19; Red (r213g037b053), April 26; Yellow (r254g245b60), May 3; Black (r000g000b000) May 10. The urls for those unreleased spots will also carry on the theme of RGB, which is a very nice touch. The colors relate to the original markers that were sold with the adicolor back in 1983.

Ad type: 
 

McDonald's wants you on its packaging

Last week, the MediaGuardian reported on McDonald's new global search for everyday folks to appear on their packaging. The company is seeking 25 brand "stars" who sum up its "I'm Lovin' it" ethos. Those selected will be flown to London for a photoshoot in August.

There is no advertising for this campaign, and instead is relying on WOM by internet communities. In applying for the opportunity to be a "brand star", McD's is asking people to tell them what they "love in life" and "how they live it" in 100 words or less, along with a picture.

Ad type: 
 

Quicky ad breaks

Motley Fool informs us that NBC is trying "speed ads" this week on its USA Network. The experiement consists of a one minute commercial ad block with 2 :30 spots which so far Walgreen and Allstate have signed up for. The rest of the commerical breaks will be their usual 2-4 minutes in length. Here's a great point by the writer of the article:

On the other hand, I can't see just how effective this experiment might be. First off, there's the sheer fact that it lasts for only five days, during one program, which wasn't identified. If the experiment is deemed a success from this small piece of data and the practice becomes more widespread, I can imagine a few things that might infuriate viewers still more -- if the commercial breaks are shorter but more frequent, for example. As a Foolish colleague of mine commented earlier, the frequency of commercial breaks is already enough to make a lot of us feel just a bit ADD. Breaking up the story too many times for quickie breaks might rile up even more of the self-righteous indignation that many viewers already feel.
Ad type: 

Pages

Top