digital

Ugoff, new BK ad directed by Roman Coppola

CP&B released yet another quirky BK ad starring Ugoff, the designer a month or two back. Thanks to BoingBoing we know know that Roman Coppola directed it, and Mark Mothersbaugh of Devo did the score.

Ugoff's website and commercial are at Ugoff.com, bonus, the actor who plays Ugoff also appears in this advert Charles Schwab - Girl Talk (2004) 0:30 (USA).

Adland: 

adgames online - samorost part 2 and Sink ya Drink

Those who remember and enjoyed the beautiful point and click game Samorost (clues here) will be pleased to know that Amanita designs have made another one, called Quest for the rest for the band The Polyphnic Spree. It's shorter and easier but still good. Amanita has also made this interactive game for Nike labs.

On another viral game note Sink Ya Drink was released on Friday, where the object of the game is to drink as many pints as possible before the pub closes. I downed 103. *hic*

Adland: 

Art of Speed - Nike shows 15 speeding films

Everyone seems quite exited about Nike teaming up with gawker to deliver a "blogvertorial"over at Gawker.com, the NYT reports. We're kind of disgusted. Advertising masquerading as editorial content is a slippery slope, adn acerebic blogs is the worst pace for them.

Gawker Media, a small company that operates snarky Web logs on culture and politics, like Gawker and Wonkette, has begun blogging on behalf of major advertisers.

Although Nike did not exercise editorial control beyond contributing the 15 films, bloggers said they wondered whether bought-and-paid-for content could succeed in the idiosyncratic world of Web logs, where an independent and acerbic streak (particularly when it comes to mainstream media) is highly valued.
"I'm skeptical that a lot of online readers would be interested in reading an advertorial blog," Patrick Phillips, the publisher of a blog called I Want Media, said. "If you got to a site, and you know you're being sold something, I don't know that there's going to be a lot of interest.''

I' m far more exited about the brilliant films - take Saiman Chow & Han Lee's speedexperiment which can be described as yellow submarine on acid. Yes, on acid, it's such a cliché but when you watch the adrenaline cells decide to have a race with no mercy on all sorts trippy vechicles inside the runners body, you'll see what we mean. Watch QT big or small

Adland: 

Really simple syndication - a site about RSS

RSS has been around for a long long time, we've had a feed since 2000, many bloggers have been using it for years and years, and now it seems to finally be catching on with the big guns as deep.ed pointed out in RSS to exist. RSS is even graduating from 'just a format' to a media in it's own right, complete with ads of course; will RSS stay ad-free?

Adland: 

For Fox sake - stop the hunt.

DMC has released a viral for the the International Fund for Animal Welfare, created together with Velocity and produced by Maverick Media. The film is a little like Trigger happy TV in that people dressed as foxes and dogs embark on a hunt in central London.
Click on the image to see it in Quicktime format. Also available in Windows Media at DMC.

Adland: 

The Day After Tomorrow Greenpeace spoofsite

It didn't take Greenpeace too long to spoof the movie website The day after tomorrow with their own version; The day after tomorrow.org, and we wouldn't expect less from the green cyberactivists.

Greenpeace twists the movies climate change drama around by asking: "The Day After Tomorrow - Who will you blame?"

"Millions of people will see this film and want to do something about the growing menace of global warming. When they visit our site, they'll learn about the real life disaster of climate change - currently being directed by Esso and produced by George W Bush," said Rob Gueterbock of Greenpeace. "This movie may be fiction, but climate change is real and we know who the bad guys are."

Greenpeace website includes movie trailers, featuring real impacts of climate change and the possibility to change the outcome of it by "taking action" now. Hat tip to Michiel

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