digital

 
 

World's first banner ad still performs really well.

Remember the AT&T "You will" campaign? The one that had the worlds first banner ad with it? We celebrated its tenth birthday, almost ten years ago here (gasp!) and with any luck we'll be cheering in Jolt Cola next year for the 20th too. The first site to run that ad was Hotwired, and the campaign began on October 24, 1994, when the internet as we know it was still in diapers. Dan Barker decided to test how this ad performs today, so he ran it again.

Adland: 
 

Google can use your +1s in ads

You might want to have a look at your shared endorsement settings on G+, as Google will start to share your +1s as displays in Google Ads. So if you don't want auntie Margo to know that you once hit +1 on that Designer Vibrator because it looked cool in a design blog (Honestly, that's where you found it. Oh, hush), you better tighten your settings.

Adland: 
 

M&C Stockholm makes really smart banners for LG

To promote LG’s new smart phone G2, M&C Saatchi Sotckholm created mobile banners that detect what kind of phone the user had, and then compared it to the LG and LG2. The ads appeared on Scandinavian HTCs, Samsungs and iPhones. Too bad the ads didn't feature their name, too. That would have really been freaky.

Hey Henrik? Why are you using that shit phone? Love, LG.

Yo, Marta! You've got one whack ass phone. Why don't you upgrade to LG2, yo?

And so on.

Agency: M&C Saatchi Stockholm

Adland: 
 

A classic idea to promote Burt's Bees Classics.

Using Vine, they Baldwin& created six second versions of classic novels like "20,000 Leagues Under The Sea" and "Little Women." All in stop motion, of course, because Vine. WHy did they do this? To promote Burt's Bees classic line up, silly!

According to the Press Release, there are others that haven't been produced yet. Like "Gulliver’s Travels,” “Metamorphosis,” “Moby Dick,” “The Scarlet Letter,” “Julius Caesar,

Pfft. Lemme know when they do "Gravity's Rainbow," or "Naked Lunch."

Adland: 
 

Facebook create "free wi-fi" logins at physical stores, just pay with your privacy

Well well, aren't they clever? To help local businesses give free wi-fi service to their customers without having to type any annoying passwords or click andy "I agree" buttons, facebook offers wi-fi login, as long as you log-in via facebook. And now they know where you be shopping at in real life too!

Adland: 
 

Honda stalks snacks on twitter to show off vacuum. Snacks stalk back!

Honda have been amusing themselves on twitter to tell snacks off with images of their built-in vacuum sucking up everything like a sweet-starved kid at a birthday party. Meanwhile the snack-brands are talking back, and now everyone knows there's a vacuum in a Honda.

Taco Bell had to jump in too, with the worst old vacuum joke ever.

Adland: 
 

Björn Borg air-drops his underwear all over the world.

As part of a new online campaign entitled The Drop famed-tennis-Icon-turned-fashion-maven Björn Borg wants to sexify the planet with his underwear line.

Upon going to The Drop, you are greeted with an intro (which didn't work for me in any of my browsers) and this phrase: ”BJÖRN BORG SAYS JA! TO WEAPONS OF MASS SEDUCTION”.

After I read that sentence I pictured Björn Borg and Kenneth Cole fist bumping.

Adland: 
 

BFG9000 serves up "Meta! Meta!" for Little Caesars

BFG9000 created this radio spot for Little Caeser's Deep Dish Pizza. But not only that. They turned it into a radio spot for Alan Varner, the actual guy who does Little Caesars voiceovers. Alan Does Voices, features the radio spot, and it also comes complete with an old tyme internet soundboard. Remember those?

I like to see Little Caesars hitting two important audiences: Those who were old enough to have a geocities page. And advertising navel gazers.

Adland: 
 

Virgin Mobile wants you to NOT BLINK and listen to their message

Don't blink. Don't blink. Oh hell, blink as much as you want to because it gets pretty funny when you do. As Virgin continues to brainwash you with their campaign message their latest idea is a hypnotic. The message is read by countless variations of scenes and people, and every time you blink, the scene changes. There's an angry eagle. A couple arguing at a restaurant. A lanky Swedish actor combing his hair in a bleakly colored bathroom.

Adland: 
 

Glock tweets prayers for victims of attack at Washington Navy Yard.

We've discussed this before, there are certain times that Brands Should Not Tweet. A good rule of thumb is, if a tragic event or natural disaster is not directly impacting or involving the brand (such as their head office, their factory, their founding city), it's probably best to keep mum. While nobody really disagrees with the 'thoughts and prayers' sentiment, a brand of snack chips praying doesn't look like empathy as much as "look at me".

Adland: 

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