press clippings about Adland

 

This is where Adland collects our fifteen megabytes of fame. Press can be quoting us, using us as reference or simply interviewing us. Adland was founded Åsk Dabitch Wäppling back in 1996. It began as a passion project, collecting recent campaigns, pairing up badland ads and as an outlet to adrant on recent happenings in the ad industry. As it grew, with a discussion list and much mail generated daily, it became a datbasedriven website collecting great (and not so great) ads serving many caustic comments and editorials on the advertising industry. The site has been used as resource or quoted by the New York Times, Adweek, Marketing Mag (Canada), the Library of Congress, Spiegel, CNN Money, Media Guardian, Resumé, Adformatie, Campaign magazine, Creativity, Svenska Dagbladet, Dagens Industri and many more.

 

"Check out Adland's amazing archive of super bowl films" SvD.se

Svenska Dagbladet: "K-Fed tog hem årets Superbowl" (english google translation here) - where Martin Jönsson also tells people to check out Adland's amazing superbowl commercial archive.

 

New York Times looks at Super Bowls past - source: Adland

Our wee link in New York Times.

We provided 16 of the 23 commercials (though we have all of them) for the graphic, you can shortcut to the ads from this post here.

Follow this link to see it. NEW YORK TIMES SUPER BOWL ADS GRAPHIC

 

We are about to move to a new server. Again.

Ok kids, we've done it again, we've outgrown yet another server. Sheesh, we go through these like Kleenex lately. Aeon is soon no more, and Ares will be our machine. Come Wednesday afternoon CET, we'll take everything down for roughly an hour and move some bits and bobs over.
If you're wondering why we're so quiet, it's cause we've been busy tinkering behind the scenes, some things are a little quirky in the archive right now. This is just a heads up, now back to your regularly scheduled ad bickering.
edit: I am the typo-queen in the mornings. Oh yeah.

 

Ten silly things you didn't know about Adland

1: Adland can be reached by quite a few URL's. One of them is Adland.eu which we don't brag about because the .eu thing is still too darn exotic. ;)

2: Adland is a common expression in the UK, which is probably why executive creative director and ex-vice chairman of Ogilvy & Mather Patrick Collister calls his column at the First post the Ad Land Column, as Tim at Adfreak alerted us to. There's also Duncan's TV Adland, Adland TV and a classified ads system called Adlandpro and many more.

3: People like to call Adland by it's URL rather than its name, which explains why there are so many mentions of "AdRag", "Ad-Rag" and "commercial archive" out there. We don't do that though, because calling "Adscam" for "www.adscam.typepad.com" or "Adfreak" for "adweek.blogs.com" or "Advertising design/Goodness" for "frederiksamuel.com/blog" is just such a mouthful. Come to think of it, "advertising design/goodness" is a mouthful right there. We simply say Adland to mean the whole enchilada here, the commercial archive, adforums and badland included. It's descriptive.

4: We coin words and expressions here. Tim from adslogans (may he r.i.p. he was a great guy) called the Badlandian pairings for "dupliclaims" which stuck, I called the rants section for Adrants way back in 1996, which these days is also the name of another well known adblog (hi Steve!, member since April 10, 2001). But the best part is that the made up word "adgrunts" spawned its own comic around life as an adgrunt. Neat.

5: All of Adland's servers have had names that are four letter words, ever since the first machine Humpty crashed badly and all the kings horses and men couldn't put it back together again. Acme, Apex and Aeon picked up the slack. Two machines were actually built by yours truly. Aeon which we use now lives in the UK and is hosted by memset.

6: Back in 2002 when the server lived in an extremely hot co-location space, I had to add an industrial size fan to the machine to keep it up. Since the fan didn't fit I got a little creative with a sponge to fill the gaps. The sponge-machine ran like that for another two years.
(See image at top of article - the soldering iron is my favourite tool. Yes, that is a snakeskin skirt.)

7: Our very first cease and desist letter came from Universal Studios back in 1999 for hosting this particular Atari christmas commercial starring E.T. . We speculated Universal was ashamed for having their character associated with a game so bad there are rumours about landfills full of unsold copies, and it might have been the nail in the coffin for Atari. We never posted the letter, simply replied and Universal realized their mistake, damn. Could have become supah-famous right there had we blogged our private correspondence like so many do these days. Doesn't pay to have class. ;)

8: Speaking of C&D's, these days they seem to be a barometer of an agency loosing the account - our most recent came from Deutsch about some Expedia films . Two weeks later it was announced they lost the account. We'll never look at a C&D the same way again.

9: There are currently 36864 Quicktime commercials in the commercial archive section alone.

10: During Adland's lifetime Dabitch has lived in San Francisco California U.S.A., Stockholm Sweden, Amsterdam The Netherlands, New York City N.Y. U.S.A, Copenhagen Denmark, and now Malmö Sweden. In that order.

 

Still chugging along - now over 35k.

We interrupt this regurlarly schedule advertising bickering to let y'all know that the commercial archive now has over thirtyfivethousand commercials in it. Count'em! Thirtyfive thousand adverts. Wooo!

 

New Media Elite - corrected

Remember when att:ention magazine put yours truly on a list of "new media elite", and misspelled my name? (post here) Well, they've run a correction in the new issue, after I emailed and threatened "If you don't run a correction, I'll burn this mag". Here's a photo of the letters to the editor page. Seems they have a sense of humor after all.

Those who get the reference win a beer.

 

The pursuit and some really good pot.

After several weeks of antibiotics, I'm finally coming out of my sick time fog, and realized that while I was under the infectious influence, two rather good archive submissions slipped by. Well, here they finally are, along with my apologies.

For Cadillac comes a campaign from Modernista Boston, toutin' Life. Liberty. And the Pursuit. From Directors Stefan Arni & Siggi Kinski, we have Crest, Heart and Trickle, and from Director Nicolai Fuglisig comes New Job (long version) and (short version). Slick.

 

Åsk is the Elite

Åsk and Adland is put on the swedish mag Att:entions list of the new media-elite!

(I have tried to interpret the Swedish lingua...)

"When it comes to marketing Åsk Wättling rules the net. More known as "Dabitch" she runs the blog "Adland" which entice thousands of marketingnerds all over the world."

Yeah. The Swedish Adland-gang is proud as hell since the rest of the list is not that good. But hey, finally... :)

See also: Ekonominyheterna.se - The new Media Elite List 2006

 

"Swedens new media elite"

Ah, how nice it is to be elite something or other as ekonominyheterna.se just named yours truly one of Swedens "new media elite". In all the exitment they slipped on the keyboard and gave me two T's instead of P's - Åsk Wättling instead of Wäppling. An honest mistake, it could happen to anyone after too many GT's, I mean those letters are practically right next to each other on a qwerty keyboard... or maybe not. ;) Still, all press is good, as long as they spell your name right. Ha!

A commenter waving a red pen has alerted them to their mistake so they've managed at least to change the headline name spelling in their list article on the new media elite. We'll glue this to our press clippings scrap book anyway. :)

 

Ekonominyheterna.se - The new Media Elite List 2006

Ekonominyheterna lists the media elite which is fun, but they misspelled my name. ;)
See these posts: Åsk is the Elite and "Swedens new media elite". For the record, the name is Wäppling. At least they we're consistent, I picked up the printed magazine and there my name was misspelled all the way through as well, which is amusing since it is one of the names that starts the article off:
"Johan Larsson.
Roger Åberg.
Åsk Wäppling.

Or why not Emma Svensson. Do the names sound familiar?...."

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