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Forget Focus groups, here comes Umbria's Blog spy

Adgrunts, quick - start up a bunch of fake blogs talking favourably about your clients and their fantastic ads... Because Umbria Communications of Boulder has a web crawler that monitors hundreds of thousands blogs, turning the language in them into data more reliable than focus groups gab.

"We can parse the speech in these blogs, break it down by nouns verbs, adjectives and phrases to derive meaning and understanding about the speech and the speaker," David Howlett, Umbria's product management vice president, told United press International. "We use machine-learning algorithms to show who the speaker is and their characteristics."
Umbrias blog-spy has already revealed a few interesting things about "generation Y", one that the females talk more about beer than males do, with Guinness the most mentioned brand. God bless Guinness, it's good for you!
"What we've found interesting in tracking the blogosphere," Howlett said, "is that in Gen Y, the females were really the instigators in the use of Web logs. A little over a year ago, the majority of bloggers were women."

Starbucks is the most mentioned non-alcoholic drink in the Gen Y blogosphere, way ahead of Pepsi and Coke. McDonald's is the fast-food brand mentioned most often, though not always as favorably as Wendy's and Taco Bell - Blame "I'm lovin' it". Read more at Science Daily.
Via fun-lovin' MetaChat!
Adland: 
 

Crest mocks elections

A new advertising campaign for Crest Whitening Expressions "mocks the great political ads of the past few elections." How original. One :30 and three :15s show people supporting the different toothpaste flavors and at the end viewers are directed to Crest's site to vote themselves. After these three air there's a fourth spot:

"Man of the Street" imitates exit poll coverage in which a news reporter interviews people on street about their choice of toothpaste flavor. "I thought voting for president was really important, but this is really something," a man states. Another woman reveals that she's a Lemon Ice supporter, but her husband backs Sweet Berry Punch and "that's why we have separate bathrooms." A Hispanic man proudly states that he's the first person in his family to be able to vote for toothpaste.

Read on for more...

Adland: 
 

Ogilvy Düsseldorf – No real beauties.

Dove soap’s European-wide "Campaign for Real Beauty" has taken on a local twist in Düsseldorf, Germany. The people next door at the local Ogilvy & Mather office have not only sold their souls to their client, but their bodies as well. These local posters are being used in conjunction with the real "Real" campaign and placed on bus stop shelters. The headline reads: "They’re not models, just soft Dove admen from Ogilvy Düsseldorf."

Previously on Dove's Real Beauty campaign:

Adland: 
 

Jaguar Urban Golf Game

Cake has done it again, in the land of advergaming they have made an urban Golf game even I bothered to play. And I don't like golf games - but it's just a different thing in a city. C'mon, grab your clubs and take to the streets of London with Jaguar Urban Golf. The production was handled by Skive Creative.
(Shockwave site by the way)

Adland: 
 

Monday 9am - wake up.

An experiment in filmmaking comes from Nic and Robbie, "Our intention is to cause you to question ... "is what you are doing and how you are being a true reflection of who you really are?" ... are you really alive or simply existing?". If you sign up the idea is that every Monday at nine a.m. you'll receive an email about a new film hosted at monday9am.tv. If you like little films, why not?
You might know Robbie from the site peopleoflondon.com.

Adland: 
 

Advertising ads - a new trend?

Yesterday, Lexus placed an advertisement to promote a TV commercial touting their lastest SUV.

A full-page ad was taken out in the UK papers informing readers to watch Channel 4 last night to view the commercial.

"When we are looking at something like Lexus... our media money is nowhere near the amount of our competitors," said Clive Baker, a regional account director with the advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi. "We really want to make a noise. It's such a change for the motor industry, it's very different to what's out there."

Microsoft did a similar thing with spreading press and ads about its infomercial for the Xbox 360 that ran on MTV last month. In the age of PVRs is this a new trend?

Adland: 
 

Real young creatives show us their.. uh.. guns.

CP&B who are handling the stunts for the Young Gun awards these came up with this campaign, real young creatives pose nekkid holding up their best work to cover their naughty bits at hardly-legal.com/.

A few - if not all - of the young hot creatives featured on the site were at one time interns at Crispin.

Adland: 
 

Do fatty food ads make obese kids? Yes. No. Maybe.

The Executive Vice President, Government Relations of the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) in the United States, Mr Dan Jaffe, has a blog where he posts opinions and commentary on ad-happenings. He also has a PR company who emails everyone who's anyone whenever he makes a new post in that blog, which I find really interesting. You don't just need a blog these days, you need a PR company as well in order to be really cool. Cooperkatz helpfully alerts me whenever Mr. Jaffa writes on about fast food ads and the rise of childhood obesity, I wonder if they ever read my earlier posts on the same topic. Jaffa writes in his post:

What is even more frustrating is that there is an ever-growing body of evidence that demonstrates that advertising is not a major factor in the obesity challenge that we increasingly face around the world. In Sweden and Quebec, for example, they banned all food advertising, yet their obesity rates are not lower than many societies that have no such restrictions and substantial rates of food advertising.

And yet again I must repeat the fact that the so called ban on advertising to children in Sweden does not exist, see the article Uninformed UK debate about childrens advertising marches on posted March 28, 2005. It's incredibly annoying that people are using this futile and fruitless "ban" as an example in their arguments.
Are they spreading disinformation on purpose or do they not know the facts I wonder. Which is worse?
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