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Ogilvy Düsseldorf – No real beauties.

Dove soap’s European-wide "Campaign for Real Beauty" has taken on a local twist in Düsseldorf, Germany. The people next door at the local Ogilvy & Mather office have not only sold their souls to their client, but their bodies as well. These local posters are being used in conjunction with the real "Real" campaign and placed on bus stop shelters. The headline reads: "They’re not models, just soft Dove admen from Ogilvy Düsseldorf."

Previously on Dove's Real Beauty campaign:

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Jaguar Urban Golf Game

Cake has done it again, in the land of advergaming they have made an urban Golf game even I bothered to play. And I don't like golf games - but it's just a different thing in a city. C'mon, grab your clubs and take to the streets of London with Jaguar Urban Golf. The production was handled by Skive Creative.
(Shockwave site by the way)

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Monday 9am - wake up.

An experiment in filmmaking comes from Nic and Robbie, "Our intention is to cause you to question ... "is what you are doing and how you are being a true reflection of who you really are?" ... are you really alive or simply existing?". If you sign up the idea is that every Monday at nine a.m. you'll receive an email about a new film hosted at monday9am.tv. If you like little films, why not?
You might know Robbie from the site peopleoflondon.com.

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Advertising ads - a new trend?

Yesterday, Lexus placed an advertisement to promote a TV commercial touting their lastest SUV.

A full-page ad was taken out in the UK papers informing readers to watch Channel 4 last night to view the commercial.

"When we are looking at something like Lexus... our media money is nowhere near the amount of our competitors," said Clive Baker, a regional account director with the advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi. "We really want to make a noise. It's such a change for the motor industry, it's very different to what's out there."

Microsoft did a similar thing with spreading press and ads about its infomercial for the Xbox 360 that ran on MTV last month. In the age of PVRs is this a new trend?

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Real young creatives show us their.. uh.. guns.

CP&B who are handling the stunts for the Young Gun awards these came up with this campaign, real young creatives pose nekkid holding up their best work to cover their naughty bits at hardly-legal.com/.

A few - if not all - of the young hot creatives featured on the site were at one time interns at Crispin.

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Do fatty food ads make obese kids? Yes. No. Maybe.

The Executive Vice President, Government Relations of the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) in the United States, Mr Dan Jaffe, has a blog where he posts opinions and commentary on ad-happenings. He also has a PR company who emails everyone who's anyone whenever he makes a new post in that blog, which I find really interesting. You don't just need a blog these days, you need a PR company as well in order to be really cool. Cooperkatz helpfully alerts me whenever Mr. Jaffa writes on about fast food ads and the rise of childhood obesity, I wonder if they ever read my earlier posts on the same topic. Jaffa writes in his post:

What is even more frustrating is that there is an ever-growing body of evidence that demonstrates that advertising is not a major factor in the obesity challenge that we increasingly face around the world. In Sweden and Quebec, for example, they banned all food advertising, yet their obesity rates are not lower than many societies that have no such restrictions and substantial rates of food advertising.

And yet again I must repeat the fact that the so called ban on advertising to children in Sweden does not exist, see the article Uninformed UK debate about childrens advertising marches on posted March 28, 2005. It's incredibly annoying that people are using this futile and fruitless "ban" as an example in their arguments.
Are they spreading disinformation on purpose or do they not know the facts I wonder. Which is worse?
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Bloggforum 2.0, the aftermath

As y'all know (if you've been paying attention, hehe) I was at the Bloggforum 2.0 in Stockholm last Saturday participating in a round table type of discussion around the topic of "Blogs and companies".
Not my favorite topic of the bunch, I was much more keen on the parallel talk "Blogs and media" which was in the room across the hall at the same time, and thanks to all the helpful participants with their MP3 podcasts I can at least listen to it now. Yeay!
And yes, this means that there is a podcast of your humble site-mum ranting on at the Bloggforum available here (mp3), thanks to the efforts of Richard Gatarski at Skolsmart. It's in Swedish though, a language I'm not used to presenting in which might explain my slight stutter as I roam my brain for the right words. Or maybe I was just dead nervous, yeah that's it. ;)

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The Media Drop Survey: What would you pay to access news and information?

Surveys are best when they get a lot of data, so if you have a minute to spare, share your input with the media drop by filling in this teeny tiny survey so that we can all see what people really think about signing up for 'free' accounts to read news. Do you do it?

Personally, it bugs me to sign up to read something, not because I have to fill in two pages of info about me (I lie every time), but because I always loose my passwords and never seem to be able to get them back. Probably because I lie even on what my email is, so I can't remember even that key piece of info when I try to figure out how to log back in. Serves me right doesn't it? ;) Also, the news site is always covered with flash and flashing banners, ugh. God bless adblock!

Totally unrelated, Gareth Kay passed me a 'Musical Baton' which I replied to here on my linklog

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