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Tsunami-filmer in Khao Lak bankrupts without payment for his film

I'm sure you remember the many eyewitness films that spread across the worlds newsoutlets after the Tsunami in 2004, many showing how people were dragged away by the masses of water. One film shows how the water left the beach, only to return as a giant wave and engulf a man who was standing on the beach, perhaps too shocked to move or unaware of what was coming right at him. The man is not seen again in the footage.

Like eveything that once hit the newspapers or airwaves, you can find it on the web. The rather iffy website Wave of destruction has said film here under the name Tsunami-Hits-Khao-Lak. At the very end of the film, you'll se a tiny blipp of an interview with Arunkul Charoenkul.

Arunkul Charoenkul filmed the waves destruction from his Café at the beach. The cafe, which could have been an economic goldmine in any other years tourist season, is located right off the beach with outdoor seating and shading trees. It's desolated this year. Arunkul sold one time airing rights to both Australian and Thai TV of his film for 500 dollars, and made some money that helped save the café and all of his employees while they had to keep the café shut the weeks immediately following the disaster .
But the film has since aired thousands of times across the world, and Arunkul Charoenkul who still owns all the copyrights for his film, has not given permission to anyone else to air nor received payment for their airing. Come October, he might have to close his cafe, unable to afford it another season.

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Mott's Clamato And The Ad Gone Bad..

Quote From: Steve Hall's Adrants

Clearly a sign the GoDaddy-like, too-hot-for-TV, banned commercial strategy to milk press has jumped the shark, Motts has aired a spot for its Clamato juice featuring, simply, the brand's logo, official sounding text indicating the ad was deemed too racy for broadcast and a plea to visit the Mott's Clamato juice website to, surprise, view the commercial. A tipster points out, humorously, when attempting to view the video, all one sees is "Error 509 Bandwidth limit exceeded." Apparently, the spot's too hot for the web too.

Adland: 
 

Ride 'em cowboy monkey!

Whiplash is a 19-year-old Capuchin monkey from Texas. He saddles up on a border collie named Ben, wears a sombrero, and rides to the rescue bearing Mexican fast-food.

At least in the ads. Whiplash was a genuine cowboy-monkey riding the rodeo circuit before he was cast as the food saving hero of the Taco John's ads last year. Like any star Whiplash has his own site at whiplashrides.com, and his own acting quirks: Don't make eye contact with him. On the first day of the first shoot the guy playing the Taco John's employee learnt this the hard way as he took three claws to the cheek. As long as you don't stare whiplash down, he won't lash out.

Whiplash is the answer to Minneapolis-based Kerker ad agency prayers, he's a popular repeat character that has given the brand an 11 percent sales growth in the past year. Copywriter Terry Thomas who first spotted him at the rodeo last year must be well chuffed with his casting of the monkey cowboy.

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Blogs in Spaaaaaaaace!

Well, as soon as we heard about it we simply had to do it, we signed up over at Blogs in space and supposedly this posting is being blipped out into deep space via a "powerful earth-based satellite broadcast" so that aliens may read this blog.
The press release states:

"I've always believed that other intelligent life forms are out there, and now, for the first time, they will be able to peer into the life of average Homo sapiens," explained Ted Murphy, President and CEO of MindComet. "We are giving bloggers the opportunity to send a piece of their lives into space to potentially connect with extraterrestrials."

Right, well it's a clever way to get hundreds if not thousands of bloggers to mention the StudlyCapped brand name MindComet. ;) Ted also says "refrain from language or content designed to provoke our alien neighbors".. Uh-huh, well lets hope that our earthly ads don't offend as many aliens as they do little old ladies in Hastings.

Adland: 
 

Divine Typos

Not all copywriters are super proficient spellers or grammar scholars. But that's why it's important to have a good proof reader on your team. Or at least a second pair of eyes to double check copy you might have been staring at for days or weeks. Spellcheckers can sometimes only help so much.

Want to see why proof readers are important to keeping your brand from looking like a fool? Read on.

Adland: 
 

Tivoing past the ads now banned in Japan?

News.com own ad blog widget posts: Skipping TV ads illegal in Japan?

That anxiety is spreading to Japan, where broadcasters are now saying that skipping commercials is actually a violation of that country's Copyright Law.

it reads, linking to a page that Yahoo Asia seems to have removed so I really can't tell if it is illegal or might become illegal.
Why this is beginning to sound just like that we posted about in '04, which reads:

Adland: 
 

"Nazis stole my idea!" (for VW logo)

Nikolai Borg, 86 years old, retired ad agency owner and graphic designer has filed suit against VW claiming that the Nazis stole his logo. Almost 60 years later Mr Borg will finally meet VW in court next month to settle the score. From the Telegraph

Mr Borg claims that his involvement with VW began in June 1939 - six years after Adolf Hitler met Ferdinand Porsche to discuss his idea for a "people's car" that could carry five people, cruise at up to 62mph, return 33 mpg and cost only 1,000 Reichmarks.

Adland: 
 

Ryan Air ad bombs

The ad with Winston Churchill showing the "victory" sign and the headline "London Fights Back" which first ran last Friday, a week after the London bombings, pulled in 192 complaints to the ASA by the end of the day. This must be some kind of record. No stranger to controversy, Ryanair has had two ads banned by the ASA back in 2001, as they were a bit naughty. One read: "Blow me! These fares are hard to swallow", and another "Satisfaction guaranteed", the ads promoted Valentines day prices.

The speecbubble reads: "We shall fly them to the beaches, we shall fly them to the hills, we shall fly them to London!"

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