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Link lust: Tactile Apple Nano ad in Japan, billboard link boom

The Cult of Mac website has captured some nice shots of the latest Apple Nano ads in Tokyo's underground, in the Shibuya district.

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The Official AdLand Advertising Tutorial: Part Two - Viral Advertising

Today we bring you Part Two of the ongoing Official AdLand Advertising Tutorial. Last time we went over radio. This week, we thought we'd share some helpful (and not so helpful) advice on creating The Viral.

The Official AdLand Advertising Tutorial:
Part Two - Key Points of Creating Viral Advertising

Professors: Brandon Barr, Brent Hahn, Clayton T. Claymore, Jane Goldman, Alec Long, Justin Kirby and Åsk Dabitch (in no particular order.)

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Attention-grabbing nudity might cause traffic accidents in Rome

Hot on the heels of that British study that revealed that a quarter of British drivers are so distracted by billboards with semi-naked models that they have dangerously veered out of their lane which caffeinegoddess reported on, comes yet another ad that diverts attention from traffic. This time it's a cheeky ad in Rome that a consumer group calls a "road hazard".

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Advertising causing bad driving?

Reuters reports that a study released today reveals that "almost a quarter of British motorists admit they have been so distracted by roadside billboards of semi-naked models that they have dangerously veered out of their lane."

One in five male drivers said their eyes were diverted from the road by posters of scantily clad women -- such as the saucy cleavage shots of model Eva Herzigova in her notorious adverts for Wonderbra.

However only one in 10 women were put off by the sight of a semi-dressed male model.

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Cream - get on top........

There's a new player in town, Cream magazine. Cream is a quarterly media mag from C Squared which apart from updating readers on the ongoings in the advertising and media world, wants to show off innovative media thinking worldwide. Each issue has a directory of case studies of creative media campaigns, and features on media, creatives behind the campaigns and such. Sound like your cup of.. eh.. cream? ;)

I got two issues here - and I'll be keeping them as they have a harder cover and will be useful to refer back to in the future. Neat feature that. ;)

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Salz Survey shows there's still issues between advertisers and agencies

Salz Consulting in New York, which has sponsored the Salz Survey of Advertiser-Agency Relations since 1986, will formally release their results for the latest survey today.

According to the results, it seems that there are issues keepigng advertisers and agencies from working well together.

The results "are a real reflection that the industry is in a huge state of flux," Ms. Salz said, as advertisers and agencies scramble to keep up with the seemingly continuous changes in consumer behavior, media choices and categories ranging from automobiles to packaged foods to telecommunications.

Even so, "as different as things are becoming," Ms. Salz said, "this is still about an old-fashioned concept, people communicating with people." And "there's still a huge opportunity to improve sales just by working better together," she said.

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The key to product placement is context

BBC Magazine takes a look at the product placement situation.

Paid product placement is currently outlawed on British TV, though the broadcasting watchdog is weighing up the possibility of relaxing the rules. It is severely restricted in other European states.

What's an ad man to do? If he makes old-fashioned ads that say "Buy this!" he's accused of being an "evil scumbag" - and if he inserts products into a TV show he's a "diabolical fiend".

Why do so many people seem so down on advertising? And if old-style ads continue to lose their impact and new forms of product placement continue to be slated, will there come a time when advertisers find it virtually impossible - or at least bloody difficult - to promote their clients' stuff?

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Market Research Studies

Whether your goal is to expand into new markets, introduce a new product or service, or gauge customer reactions, even the smallest of small businesses can benefit from a simple but well planned market-research study.

Market research helps you understand your market, your customers, your competitors and larger industry trends. Good research will reveal details about your current customers and help you target new customers. For example, before you open an organic produce market, find out if there's a demand for food grown without pesticides and if customers will pay more for it.

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