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From selling trash to selling everything

Want a piece of the NYC landscape? An Art Director living in New York packages and sells trash, artfully arranged in plastic cubes. Apparently his love for trash blossomed while attending the School for Visual Arts in New York. Makes one wonder what the people who purchase these "works of art" actually do with them.

Copywriter Brian Thompson might not be selling trash, but he is selling his life. Everything he owns is up for sale on eBay, with new items added weekly.

From my portfolio to my toothpaste, everything must go.

He hopes "it will be an entertaining exploration of the consumer culture we help shape."

I just hope he doesn't start selling his kidneys or anything! Although it would be interesting if someone else gets a job using his portfolio.

Adland: 
 

Resumé blurb Pussy Galore

Our little tidbit about Pussy Galore to join M&S advertising campaign reached the Swedish advertising tradepress Resumé, with a (rare for a lot of tradepress) nice nod to us, their source.
Original article scan

 

Another buncha Switch parodies

Well, that meme for switching to Macs, or PCs, or to wine over beer, or whatever isn't going to die just yet, so we bring you two more Apple Switch parodies.

Skyler switched. To a PC. To prepare her....

.....and over in the "switch to Linux" corner we have a super-villan stating "Linux gives us the power we need to crush those who oppose us", a Flash animation from Transbuddah.com.

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Swimsuit Issue? What Swimsuit Issue?

Some would say the attitude toward media in the United States has taken a decidedly conservative shift. Howard Stern would probably say that. So would Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake. Abercrombie & Fitch, too. Others. Now, Sports Illustated is giving subscribers the chance to opt out of the annual swimsuit issue. They say it has nothing to do with the chill in the media air.

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Embracing Real Beauty (part 2)

I had a chance to speak with Guy Gould-Davies, one of the planners who worked on the hair care part of the Dove campaign. He told me that as the manifesto for Dove was being formed and the UK executions were going out in front of the public, the team at Ogilvy in Chicago was given the task of creating a campaign for Dove hair care products.

Adland: 
 

Embracing Real Beauty (Updated)

Soap. It's considered a parity product. But Dove doesn’t see itself as such. "In 1957, Dove® Beauty Bar was born. What made it different from other soap cleansers? It really wasn't soap at all. It used mild, non-soap ingredients, plus 1/4 moisturizing cream, so it didn't dry our skin like soap. This was a unique combination and the first of its kind." This Dove bar brand heritage was the basis for the Dove mandate, which started about 2 1/2 years ago- that as the company started to create new products (deodorant, hair care, etc), "any product Dove comes out with must go back to the idea of the Dove bar".

Adland: 
 

Another year added to the Super Bowl Commercial Archive

January 16 1972 was the 6th Super Bowl, and whaddya know now we have some of the 1972 Super Bowl VI commercials in the ever-growing Claymore Project, the Super-Bowl-o-rama collection. So while we wait for Feb 6th and Super Bowl XXXIX to roll around and be added to our collection, you can walk down memory lane to back when Pabst still ran lifestyle TV commercials.
Thirty one years of Super Bowl commercials are now available in the archive - no other collection on the web is this complete, so if you are an ad-nut welcome to our one stop shopping ad archive. ;)

 

Mirror Mirror On The Wall, Who's The Quietest Tsunami Donor Of Them All?

Remember back in 2000 when Philip Morris ran those nauseatingly transparent spots taking credit for the good it was doing for flood victims and battered women? And what did they get for their $100 million? Well, I don't think I'm sticking my neck out here when I say that all the allied bombers in World War 2 took less flak than PM. Now comes the tsunami. Have companies learned a lesson? For the most part, they have. The question is, have they gone too far this time?

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