Clorox on my pizza?!

 
 

Clorox on my pizza?!

We can't escape ads these days. Not really a problem for me, since I'm always up for seeing a good ad.

But in this case I thought the placement was a little odd.

Picked up a couple pizzas last night, and the box tops were big ads for Clorox bleach. Not exactly the brand I want sponsoring my food.

Who else is advertising on pizza boxes? Has anyone seen a better tie-in lately? A worse one?

Adland: 

Comments

.. the placement that is. Weird. Worst I've seeen was 'accidently' generated - banner ads back in 1997 followed keywords. When "mercedes" was mentioned (or any other car brand for that matter) a banner for Mercedes would pop up on newssites everywhere. Then Lady Di went and died in a car accident... Guess which banner graced the webpages.

Strange connection to make between the bottom of the pizza box to cleaning a floor. Not very appetizing either.

OK so Clorox cuts trough grease and pizzas are greasy... So far so good... But, this does get strange, if Clorox tried to clean the box it would most likely disintegrate, being made of paper and all.. It's not a floor, it's a real appetite killer ad placement as well... Somewhere something went wrong with the idea.

I get the tie-in only if they tied it in. Hmm? Leaves one to wonder. I have yet to see others but there was another recent pizza campaign that had me perplexed. I was at Bally's Total Fitness and as I was exiting got harrased by a Papa John's pizza guy who was giving away free whole pizzas. Are they not the antithesis of one another?

wow, that's another odd one. Was it a fat-free 0 calorie pizza? Didn't think so.
I'd get it if it were a free fat-free frozen yogurt, smoothie or somesuch 'treat' after a hard workout, that won't ruin the workout. But Pizza?

I think it's great. At least they are trying to break through the BS and capture some attention. Better than another 30 second commercial that we all TIVO away from.

What pizza place was this from?

Miami Herald (reg req.)

How well does this kind of advertising work?

"We didn't get as much response as we expected," said Marcia Anderson, director of marketing for WOW! Work Out World, which operates seven fitness clubs in New Jersey, including five in Monmouth and Ocean counties. The boxes include coupons that bearers can use for free seven-day trials at the clubs. "We were hoping for a little more of a bounceback with the coupons," she said.

The campaign is a success, though, in creating more awareness of the WOW! Work Out World name, which could eventually translate into more members, she said.
Before giving boxes for free to some restaurants recently, Work Out World paid to have advertising on boxes that were distributed last fall. The boxes bore slogans such as "It takes a lot of dough to make a pizza, but you won't need a lot of dough to join WOW!" "It's corny, I know" said Anderson, but she said the chain wants the public to know it has a sense of fun.

Michael Aaron Rockland, a professor of American studies at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, has some reservations about the increased presence of advertising in daily life.
"We're a capitalist society, so none of this need surprise us," Rockland said. "At the same time, there are issues of good taste." America is about more than profit, and "if we keep going the way we're going, we'll be selling absolutely everything," he said.

Naming rights to the Continental Airlines Arena have been sold, he noted, and the PNC Bank Arts Center. Coca-Cola has a $10 million exclusive contract with Rutgers, a public university, to be the only soft-drink supplier on campus, Rockland said.

"Fifty-thousand faculty, staff and students on campus can't drink anything but Coca-Cola products," he said. "When I'm at a Rutgers basketball game and the announcer says 'It's always Rutgers, it's always Coca-Cola,' I want to throw up."

The other day I was behind a bus and it had an ad on the back of it for Clorox which said "If this bus was a floor we'd clean it", which I think makes much more sense than the pizza box - or at least it's a bit more appealing.

My local pizza shop has recently begun sending out pizza boxes with ads for "The Prince & Me" (starring Julia Stiles). This kind of tie-in might work - "rent a film - eat a pizza"

Allan

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