END CAMPUS RAPE - women are now notches on a helmet.

Baylor University has been rocked by sexual assault scandals as a law firm hired by the University has concluded that Baylor's football program and athletic department has failed to effectively respond to sexual assault complaints.

If you've read the news in the past few years, this is but one sexual assault scandal among many. In fact, you might even see it as a worrying pattern. You might want to do something about it. That's probably exactly what Rance Randle, whom we once had in the ad chat seat here, and his current writing partner Greg Dyer, were thinking when they embarked on this project.

Their idea shows a re-creation of a Baylor University helmet, covered with stickers symbolizing a woman's body.

What? I mean, graphically, I get it. In fact, as simple as your clip art urinal woman in the correct shade of green is, that sort of simplicity is often difficult to achieve, but still.. what?
My immediate reaction is notches on a gun handle, a bed post, or even that old urban myth of boys collecting panties from the virgins they had taken. How are you guys not seeing that? If I were playing football at 16 and a male, I would probably be plastering my helmet full of this just to hide that I wasn't popular with the ladies. The stickers players put on helmets are accomplishments, and you literally just made bedding women one of the accomplishments. How is that going to stop sexual assault? How does this address the problem of rapes? Do you believe that once a bunch of guys get together and play a team sport, rape just happens? It seems all very surface level thinking here, losing sight of how the audience that only have a second and don't have much time to spend figuring out these women stickers and what the really mean... It's not like you can walk up to everyone who saw this and explain your thinking behind it.

Don't get me wrong, guys, as a visual it's visceral and thus very arresting, which is exactly what a visual should be. But had this been a visual in a poster with a line that read something else, I could see it working. In fact I see it as a great visual to warn against STD's.

"We wanted to raise awareness about a bigger issue," Dyer told ATTN:. "We kind of wanted to show that even though we love sports we can still be critical what’s wrong with them, and we can still try to make them better and make people aware of them.
It seemed like the most iconic way to represent visually. When you see it you automatically understand that it’s a woman," Randle told ATTN:. "We thought that iconic imagery you would see on a bathroom door would read much quicker and to our happiness it has read pretty well."

College football, where women look like the urinal sign and we use that to count how many we bedded.

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Dabitch Creative Director, CEO, hell-raising sweetheart and editor of Adland. Globetrotting Swede who has lived and worked in New York, London, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Stockholm after growing up in Kiruna, Raleigh and Jiddah.