Faking it in social media = the new way to get lots of youtube visits?

 
 

Faking it in social media = the new way to get lots of youtube visits?

Here's an idea that's so halfbaked it couldn't stand on its own even if it tried. So how do you get it out to the adblogs? Stir up a little controversy! Controversy spreads like wildfire!

This film was uploaded to youtube by jvmlbe Apr 12, 2011 on behalf of their client http://www.lullaland.net/, and so far it has a little over 4000 visits which isn't much over there.

Update The youtube video has been removed by the user. I'll just show it to you here. Dear JVMlbe, let me remind you that you're using other peoples intellectual property (as faked screenshots, no less) in a non-parody situation before you get on the phone to your lawyers about this.


Lullaland - Goodnight hashtag Case Study - (2011)

It tells the story of a social media "campaign" that is, in short, twitter-bot-spam. The bot responds to anyone that says #goodnight - a hashtag. People say goodnight on twitter all the time, and bots respond to keywords and hashtag all the time too. That's all well and good, but how do you get a thousand blogs to write about this?

Ivan of adsoftheworld notices that his blog is mentioned in the case study, but he never wrote about this case. Neither did any of the other blogs you see. He posts JVM fakes blogosphere feedback, and soon work that matters and everyone else is writing about it too. Me included.

Ivan says:

I emailed the creator of the video on YouTube, but got no response. I don't mind to be honest. All publicity is good, but I think it's unfair towards the viewer who believes all this actually happened. What's your opinion?

And his reaction is his own. If I saw a fake screendump of adland in a case study, I'm not sure how I'd react. But being a professional paranoid cynic, my gut reaction is: Oh, you'e trying to make me write about this are you? This story after all, will ensure that everyone in the adblog world spends an afternoon talking about a shit spambot "campaign". Well played?

edit: Also, Fey & Co? faking? :P

Update Jung von Matt explain the Lullaland screenshots: Art Director mistake. Okay....

Adland: 

Comments

You're too kind about the idea here. It's got holes everywhere. People don't hashtag "goodnight", they tweet the word. And who would click a spambot link just to hear a lullaby?

Add new comment

Top