Flicka reveals what is behind the retouching

 
 

Flicka reveals what is behind the retouching

We reported last year that the Flicka campaign teaches girls to question media. The campaign continues with a new banner campaign, and on Flickas website there is a photo of 14 year old Lynn retouched like most magazine covers are, where you can peel away the retouch and find what is underneath.
Just click on the orange star-splash on the right to see how she looked before the boob enlargement, waist reduction, color of her eyes thickness of her hair and pores on her nose were changed, one item at a time. Everyone knows that a little photoshopping is always done on the cover models but it's still quite interesting to see how much exactly.
"The banner campaign is a logical contination of what we were doing last year. We don't want to moralize about retouching images, but want to equip the young with tools to see through the "perfect" images out there." said Sara Damber project leader for the Flicka campaign to Resume. Ad agency behind the campaign is Forsman och Bodenfors Gothenburg, Sweden.

update: Sorry, I should have been more helpful about the navigation, here's how you waltz around the image even if you can't read Swedish;

1) The words "Avslöja bluffen - klicka här" will appear in the starburst, click that star burst!
2) the cover will change, now you have a menu of sorts on the left and a bar at the bottom. You can go through each of the twelve steps one at a time, each word is a different body-part and I know you will guess that "bröst" indeed means breasts. "Midja" means waist and is an interesting one.
Once you click on a part you will see the unretouched image, and the retouched toggling for comparison once. You can toggle yourself with line in the white box at the bottom that reads "Visa efter retuch" (show after retouch) or "visa före retuch" (före = before).

Hoep that helps. Have fun.

Adland: 

Comments

She's cute, but wow...she's only 14. It's a minefield out there, guys. Watch out for those boobytraps.

I have a hard time being upset by this. The FLICKA.org-campaign is politically strange since it's a governmental sponsored anti-advertising campaign.

A media-awereness campaign does not = anti-advertising, it seems a bit naive to equate the two. I'm not sure what you are trying to say though.

Now that he campaign is over you can view the retouching ad over in F&B's online portfolio where a demo is still available.

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