Google kills flash in Chrome - effectively kills the future of flash banner ads.

Adland: 

There's been signs for a while. The International Advertising Bureau set HTML5 as the new industry standard in interactive marketing. Mozilla created *shumway' to shun flash away. Even Amazon banned flash ads on their network. Now, announced last week, Google are blocking flash ads in Google chrome. Chrome users will now actively have to choose to animate advertising content, if they find it interesting. The official reason is because flash "increases page-loading times and kills battery more quickly", but we all know that Flash ads are also how banner hijackings happen, so it's a security issue too.

Adobe has been trying to move people on to Adobe Air for some time, but HTML5 has been the easy use option that gained popularity quicker. Advertisers can still run flash banners on Googles ad network, and hope people select the option to play them, but with most browsers rejecting flash by default now, it's high time to stop using flash in banners.

Comments (3)

  • sport's picture
    sport

    Reading our old comments at banner hijacking still going strong, and you're basically warning the world that banner ad revenue is dying unless the business is cleaned up - in 2008! How does it feel to be right?

    Sep 07, 2015
  • kidsleepy's picture
    kidsleepy

    People do not click on rich media to enable sound. Why on earth are they going to click to play them? Might as well throw your money away.

    Sep 07, 2015
  • Dabitch's picture
    Dabitch

    Feels good, Sport, but my drawer full of I-told-you-so's don't pay the rent. Next up: killing off those tremendously annoying YOUTUBE EMBED ads that play randomly somewhere on a page where you're actually already there to watch a news clip or something.

    Please lets kill that, it's the worst.

    Sep 07, 2015

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Dabitch Creative Director, CEO, hell-raising sweetheart and editor of Adland. Globetrotting Swede who has lived and worked in New York, London, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Stockholm.