The royalest of beers.

 
 

The royalest of beers.

A good lead from Hlebarov brings us this pairing of beer ads. Now, I'm absolutly positive that Heineken was doing the same thing - at least on posters - back in 2001, possibly created by Neboko. I'm sure there are more examples but I can't find any in my archives at the mo' - if you have any link them in comments (or just email them to the hostmaster).

This is a new tv commercial recently released in Bulgaria for Heineken's brand Kaiser beer. Since Heineken owns it they might even have spun the idea from the Heineken poster I mention. Super adgrunts watch it here. It makes sense, as a Kaiser actually wears a crown don't they?


Kaiser King of beers 2006

This is Budweiser King of beers from 2001. For any European beer lover this makes little sense, we're hard pressed to call it beer much less King. ;)


Budweiser - King of Beers (2001)

I'm sure there are loads more. Show'em if you got 'em!

Adland: 
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Comments

Coloribus ADmirror has several of these

Ah, well there you go the Heineken one I was blabbering about is there.

Longtime adlister Henrik said "I have a picture of Budweiser doing it in Shanghai, outdoor in the subway" which sounds kinda kinky, but then here's the image.

Budweiser lawyers will shut that down in a real hurry once they get wind of it.

Pffft. Right, and Dolly Parton sleeps on her belly. I doubt that.

On what do you base this assumption? Has Budweiser trademarked the upside-down cap or the phrase "King of beers" or something?

Actually, I believe that Budweiser trademarked "King of Beers" many, many years ago. So far back that I can't remember when.

I understand European reluctance to drink American beers. They're not as flavorful or robust here in the States....

At the other end sits a venerable Czech brew that has been called "Budweiser" throughout Europe since the 13th century, but must be called "Czechvar" in the U.S., due to pressure from its richer (but blander) cousin from St. Louis.

Wanna bet that journalist loved getting "richer (but blander)" in there? ;)

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