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People dancing in shapes, times two, BT vs Het Nieuwsblad.

Sqaure eyed super adgrunts and other adnerds probably recall last years BT advert "talk talk" where people seen from above dance into different shapes, such as a rolling pram, a couple of children and a heart pierced by an arrow. Re-see it here at chiadvertising.

Seems that the crew who can dance like this have a great agent, because we found another ad where they do the same thing thanks to a friendly adnerd named Joost. Talk Talk 'shapes' shameless copy inside.

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The way things go - Der Lauf Der Dinge

You probably recall the fuss kicked up by Swiss artists Peter Fischli and David Weiss back in 2003, as the Honda Cog spot created by Wieden & Kennedy was a wee bit too close to their award-winning 1987 masterpiece, Der Lauf Der Dinge (The Way Things Go).
Well, for all of you who never saw the way things go, here you go, 29 min 45 sec of things going..and going..and going...


For comparisons sake:

The Honda Cog
advert is in the archive, weighs 8.6 MB - super adgrunts can watch it.

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Knorr vs. McDonald's

These two spots sound alike to us, but what the bleep do we know?

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Bloody hell, you can't show a half-full beer in Canada

The ad story that just won't die this month seems to be Australia's "Where the bloody hell are you?" campaign. It launched the last week of February and was created by M&C Saatchi in Sydney.

First, the ad was restricted in the UK for the word "bloody", which was eventually overturned after the Australian Tourism Minister, Fran Bailey, took a trip to London to defend the use of the word in the campaign.

Then Canada's CBC restricted the spot during family broadcasts for the ad for the use of "hell." Now, they are asking for the ad to be edited to remove a shot showing a half-full pint of beer.

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Bloody is now bloody OK for OZ

The British restriction on the Australian tourism ad "Where the bloody hell are you?" which was not allowed to run in its original form because of the use of "bloody" has been reversed. The Australian Tourism Minister, Fran Bailey, flew to London in the hopes of saving the campaign.

"I am pleased that common sense prevailed and the regulators realised the campaign was intended to be cheeky, friendly and very Australian," Bailey told reporters.

I doubt the Australians are that upset though since the TV ban provided a ton of free publicity for Tourism Australia, which said it had created "an on-line traffic jam" around the A$180 million campaign.

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Australia's tourism ad restricted for "bloody" in UK

The end of last month we reported on Australia's new tourism campaign featuring the tagline, "Where the bloody hell are you?". Now the UK's Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre has restricted the ad.

"How anyone can take offence at a beautiful girl in a bikini on a sunny beach inviting them to visit Down Under is a mystery to me," Federal Tourism Minister Fran Bailey said.
Tourism Australia managing director Scott Morrison said the ban, which applied only to the use of the word "bloody" on commercial television, was "a marketer's dream."

"We would have preferred the ad to run the way we first made it, but we can still run it the way it is cut now, which says 'Where the hell are you?'," Mr Morrison said. "It is not as if it is not going to be shown on UK television. It will be shown. It will just have that slight adjustment to it. It will be run in its original format on the internet, in cinemas and everywhere else."

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Diesel Scorpion ad gets banned after no longer running

Diesel's Scoprion ad has been banned by the ASA after a run in The Sunday Times Style Magazine lead to complains.

The complainants objected that the position of the women's legs around the man's body overtly suggested sexual behaviour and was therefore offensive. They were also concerned that the image was unsuitable in a magazine that might be seen by children. One complainant, who believed the man in the ad was black, objected that the ad was racist.
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Saatchi copies Saatchi - again!?

Seems third time’s the charm, with this new ad from Saatchi’s NY, which uses the same idea as the Sunny D TVC created by Saatchi’s NY only months before, which itself is a copy of the "sun as ball" idea created by Saatchi’s London eight years earlier for the drink, Verb. I think this is a case of three strikes and someone’s gotta be out.

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Husbands and wives battle for your product

Seems that the "husband/wife competing for your product" concept has been done and done and done yet again. We found three, but there are sure to be even more of these out there. SuperAdgrunts, check out the similarities in these spots for Toyota Rav4, Mercury, and Kohler.

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Katjes - no, no, no!

In Denmark the candy-brand Katjes have been slapped with an ad ban. The german brand Katjes have been selling their winegums with a false promise, and a top model named Heidi Klum. In one of the ads (screenshots below) Heidi talks to the camera about inner beauty, and that red noses and big ears don't matter "...it's just more to bite into" she giggles as she devours a winegum. The end tagline says "Katjes - yes yes yes!" and promises that their winegums only have 0.3% fat.

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A+ logo duplication

What do a Romanian pharmaceutical company and a private luxury jet arm of United Airlines have in common? Their logo. Dada dada tips us off to these logo twins. The Avolar logo (on the right) was created in 2001 by Landor while Antibiotice's logo (on the left) was created in 2005 by Grapefruit. My guess is that this is not an instance of stealing, but more along the lines of brainsync just due to the numbers of "A+" logos out there, not to mention that probably 80% of those come from companies with names like "A+ Window Cleaning", etc.

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Disaronno pleasure ad too pleasure filled

A Disaronno ad from 2003 and originally from the US aired in UK cinemas recently. But, it has now been banned for sexual overtones and "was in breach of guidelines linking sexual pleasure with alcohol consumption."

This ad is just one among other brands that have felt the hand of the ASA. Young's Bitter and Lambrini have been rapped in the past for the same violations.

SuperAdgrunts, see the "banned" spot here:
Disaronno-Pass the pleasure around - "Ice Cube"

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Cesar vs. Shaggy Dog

Advertising's going to the dogs and this badlander proves it.

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Groovecutters accuse French Connection/BMB of ripping off video

Oh no, not again! It seems that the band Groovecutters, is accusing French Connection and its advertising agency Beattie McGuinness Bungay of 'ripping off' their music video for their Kung-fu lesbian TV/Cinema ad that starting airing in the UK on Sunday and made headlines because of the number of complaints it had received.

Kev Keane, one of Groovecutters, said: "It's such a rip-off. I am not even sure if FCUK know how much of a copy it is. Would they have approved it if they knew it was not specially created for them to spearhead their £2m campaign.

"It just makes me laugh that something that was created for our track has been changed into something that symbolizes French Connection's latest corporate message."

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Belgian campaign revives old look for one second.

When I spotted (bad pun intended) Duval Guillaume's new campaign for one second breath mint I was instantly reminded of the Badlander Pore Bore back in 2k. But hey it's been six years I s'pose that now is as good a time as any to revive an old look and call it a "clearly differentiating visual style...." as CD/AD Dirk Domen said to Creativity magazine, even though it isn't. Read more to see the ads and a few more 50's cartoon style ads.

Previous hype on "one second", the world first one second advert, which wasn't the worlds first one-second advert at all.

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