Banned ads

 

Banned ads

 

Dolce & Gabbana knife ad axed by ASA

Dolce & Gabbana has had some theatrical looking ads where men brandish knives banned by the ASA. After receiving 157 complaints, including from groups such as Mothers Against Murder And Aggression (“MAMAA”) and Media March the ASA agreed that the knives were brandished aggressively and the image of a man lying on the ground with a wound to his forehead added to the overall impression of violence and upheld the complaint.

Badland: 
 

Lavazza gets pin-up ad banned in Sweden

Swedes - the prudes with the scandalous reputation and the high ratio of buxom blondes has banned a Lavazza ad as it was discriminating. See tame pin-up inside.

Badland: 
 

Bishops Finger ad deemed too raunchy

A woman in a revealing mediaeval frock sits perched atop a hay bale, declaring "I love a good session on the Bishop's Finger". , and honestly now who doesn't? I know I love a good round of the Bishop's finger!

Sadly, the ASA didn't like the pun and thought that the womans suggestive pose linked alcohol to seduction and sexual activity. But honestly now, with a name like that what is a decent ale to do but link to sex?

A Shepherd Neame spokesperson said today the ale's advertising campaign was designed to amuse, not offend.
Badland: 
 

Dumbest ad ban ever.

BBC news reports about an ad being banned because a punter typed the wrong URL.

The radio advert which pointed people to thinkuknow.co.uk a site that advises children on how to stay safe online, can not be broadcast again in its current form.
A listener who wanted to see the site spelled the url with "you" instead of "u" and ended up on a porn-link page.

Chris Fox, as sly as one, the "you" URL's owner is probably laughing all the way to the bank. The "you" URL was registered 15-Feb-2006, shortly after the first airing of the now banned advert. Clever. Remember kids, have all common variations of your URL registered before your enemies do. ;)

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Jeffery West ad with gun banned

gunNaughty Jeffery West have been glamourising guns say the ASA - and have banned the advert featured on the right for depicting mob life as hip and being generally irresponsible. The vixen driving isn't even wearing a seatbelt fer cryin' out loud!

"We noted the gun merely lay on the car seat and was not used in a violent or threatening way and that GMC believed the image was clearly fictional and implied a gangster's moll.
Badland: 
 

No more Owen = No more Northen Rock ads.

My bad juju-vibes sent Michael Owen off the field two minutes into the match against Sweden (or perhaps it was just bad luck and nothing to do with me decapitating chickens and dancing naked smeared in their blood) - as he twisted his knee really nasty and was sent off the field. No more Owen in the cup.
Read more for the really unfortunate ad placement of the week.

Northern Rock has had Owen in their ad campaign, and featured featured him wrapped in the England flag alongside slogans such as "One of ours over there" and "Can we have him back in one piece please?". Well, the latter is a rather unfortunate headline - and inside is a rather unfortunate placement of the ad.

Badland: 
 

Pro bono ad banned for "attacking football"

Wow, footie fever has reached new heights and clearly broiled the brains of the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre watchdog who just banned an ad for "attacking football."

The banned advert from World Vision was encouraging viewers to sponsor a child in the Third World, it showed a young African boy playing football with a ball made out of maize, bags and string. The VO then said: "England's team are sponsored for £49million. Masidi is sponsored for 60p a day."

Badland: 
 

Widespread concern about the "battle of the sexes"

A total of 17 complaints, lead the Advertising Standards Complaints Board to review a Toyota Rav 4 ad by Saatchi & Saatchi. It was found to have "breached three principles in its code of ethics: that advertisements should be prepared with a due sense of social responsibility, should not contain anything likely to cause serious or widespread offence, and should not contain dangerous practices which encourage a disregard for safety." They also claim that 17 complaints constitutes evidence of widespread concern.

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Bloody hell, you can't show a half-full beer in Canada

The ad story that just won't die this month seems to be Australia's "Where the bloody hell are you?" campaign. It launched the last week of February and was created by M&C Saatchi in Sydney.

First, the ad was restricted in the UK for the word "bloody", which was eventually overturned after the Australian Tourism Minister, Fran Bailey, took a trip to London to defend the use of the word in the campaign.

Then Canada's CBC restricted the spot during family broadcasts for the ad for the use of "hell." Now, they are asking for the ad to be edited to remove a shot showing a half-full pint of beer.

Badland: 
 

Bloody is now bloody OK for OZ

The British restriction on the Australian tourism ad "Where the bloody hell are you?" which was not allowed to run in its original form because of the use of "bloody" has been reversed. The Australian Tourism Minister, Fran Bailey, flew to London in the hopes of saving the campaign.

"I am pleased that common sense prevailed and the regulators realised the campaign was intended to be cheeky, friendly and very Australian," Bailey told reporters.

I doubt the Australians are that upset though since the TV ban provided a ton of free publicity for Tourism Australia, which said it had created "an on-line traffic jam" around the A$180 million campaign.

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