spoof or homage

 

spoof or homage

 

A check or a fish? Depends on how you see it.

Another set on our little list of twin logos. One mans cheap printing is another mans shopping center located at the harbour where the fish mongers used to be. Just proof that when you simplify things enough, it could be anything really. ;)

Previus logo mishaps: Xerox vs Logoworks, Quark and the scottish art council, Hampel Global Toilets and Hyregästföreningen, The EU presidency vs Bruges Group.

Badland: 
 

Channel crossing can be dangerous

The French telecom market is adopting the 118 number for direct enquieries just like in the UK a couple of years ago. And while they were at it, one client in France decided to adapt to the local market the same advertising campaign that made its mark in the UK. The result is this campaign for 118 218, directly taken from the brilliant UK 118 118 campaign by WCRS in London, and proof that some ideas should never cross the Channel.

Judge for yourself:
118 218 (France) : http://www.lenumero.fr/films.html

Badland: 
 

Platform wars in advertising.

The battle between Microsoft and Apple rages on. These past few weeks more than one eyebrow was raised when Microsoft published a rather strange ad pointing out that people were entering peoples houses through teeny tiny wires. Apple has to spoof that one. Read more to see the ads.

Badland: 
 

Real Spoofs of genius!

Mr Pocky Snack inventor, Mr anime fan - yes, the real american genius (or heroes as they used to be called before it went out of fashion) ads for Bud Light have been deservedly spoofed, as Pocari Sweat real otaku heroes radio ads.

Badland: 
 

Nike is paying homage to... Or plagiarising?

Minor Theft - over at Pitchforkmedia one can see comparisons between Minor Threats cover art and a current Nike poster. Both carry the high contrast image of a bald shaven guy sitting with his head in his arms in a staircase. Both have the words running down the right in block text: "Minor Threat" vs "Major Threat".

"You don't need a degree in graphic design to notice the similarities here. They're the fucking same. Oh, wait-- one is blue, not red. And Major, not Minor. And there are some Nike logos tossed in there. This brings to mind an interview with Vanilla Ice, defending the differences between "Ice Ice Baby" and "Under Pressure" ("dun dun dun duh-duh-duh dun" vs. "DUN dun dun dun duh-duh-duh dun")."

A rep from Discord records replied when PitchforkMedia asked "Did Nike ask permission" with :

"No, they stole it and we're not happy about it. Nike is a giant corporation which is attempting to manipulate the alternative skate culture to create an even wider demand for their already ubiquitous brand. Nike represents just about the antithesis of what Dischord stands for and it makes me sick to my stomach to think they are using this explicit imagery to fool kids into thinking that the general ethos of this label, and Minor Threat in particular, can somehow be linked to Nike's mission. It's disgusting."

The Major Threat Skateboard tour dates can be found on Nike's site Nike skateboarding where the "homage" artwork serves as a punk-nod tour poster. Is it parody? Is it a homage? Is it a lazy art director? What do you think? Thanks to salmonberry who emailed me the pitchfork link and hat tip to me3dia at Metafilter for the gossip.
Badland: 
 

Citroen CV2 - dancing citroen spoof

Alex Mallinson over at X-bam illustration decided one day to mock that dancing Citroen ad and got busy. In five days he managed to create the bulk of it all, 16 hours of car/robot construction, another 16 hours animating that, 8 hours creating the carpark and then set it to render which took 8 days. So, in less than two weeks he managed to make this film, which mocks the original quite well.

The original Citroen "transform".

Badland: 
Adland: 
 

Stolen Jeans, the story of not stolen copy-concept

Fans of Badland know that sometimes, twin ideas just happen. Blame it on syncronicity, similar thought patterns, the idea Gods or aliens, or just a bad-idea-day, no one knows exactly why it happens... But we do know that it does. Read more to see three very original stolen jeans ideas from three different countries all appearing independent of each other.

photo thanks to Mårten at Bold.se, via this thread (in Swedish).

Badland: 
 

Mastercard steals from Swingers = Priceless.

When the movie Swingers was released in 1996 the script and the story brought out the best from the actors in it and propelled them all to big time Hollywood fame. One hilarious scene in Swingers was when Jon Favreau's character "Mike" leaves increasingly pathetic messages on "Nikki's" answering machine, as the machine keeps cutting him off. (scene here). Mastercard has just released a commercial where the scene is nearly identical, right down to the character's names, Mike and Nikki. Tut tut McCann-Erickson, did you really think the world wouldn't notice? Is this an intentional homage (considering the names) or just a lazy rip-off? You decide.
Super adgrunts view the ad in the commercial archive

Badland: 
 

The religious iPod spoof

This is one of the funnier spoofs I've seen.

I saw it outside London's St. Lukes church.

Badland: 
 

NetZero's AOL bashing ad spoof

Slate, after already criticising AOL's lame "You got it" ads, goes on to praise NetZero's parodies of AOL's ads.

"In the last 'Ad Report Card,' I chided AOL for its lame new campaign (and lamer business model). I said AOL was screwed because other dial-up providers, such as NetZero, offer a near-identical service for much less money. Apparently, NetZero's not at all afraid to kick a brand when it's down."

The ads are in the archive: AOLs "Kimberly" (Mom), NetZeros Mom. AOL's "All of them", Netzero's "All of them".

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