Badland

 
 

Pro bono ad banned for "attacking football"

Wow, footie fever has reached new heights and clearly broiled the brains of the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre watchdog who just banned an ad for "attacking football."

The banned advert from World Vision was encouraging viewers to sponsor a child in the Third World, it showed a young African boy playing football with a ball made out of maize, bags and string. The VO then said: "England's team are sponsored for £49million. Masidi is sponsored for 60p a day."

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iPod music is like drugs......

Seems the iconic ipod art direction strikes again - the art director who came up with it is hopefully laughing herself silly all the way to the bank - this time the silouettes are used to warn against drugs. Scaryideas has images of the junkie iPod ads, which read "not all drugs are as harmless as music".

Scary ideas explains the posters "Guerilla campaign for the Berlin Suchthilfe, the Berlin drug awareness organisation." I'd hardly call that guerilla, and unforunatly there's no posting date. The url that seems to be on the posters, www.berlinersuchthilfe.de doesn't exist in the denic.de database. Who knows when this ran.

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What a lemon sounds like

Yet another spoof to the W+K's Choir spot for Honda. This time it's for TheDailyPie.

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Throwaway brands and odd color sync

"Everything red becomes blue" shouts a new campaign for Vodafone in Sweden, which no longer will be called Vodafone, instead it will be called Telenor. The old droplet/quote logo in red is exchanged for some random fan/swirl in blue. Sonofon in Denmark joins in and use that blue logo - however they won't change their name.
What is it about cellphone providers that make them want to change their names and logo's all the time? Before it was Vodafone, it used to be Europolitan. And before that, who knows... More inside for some oddly syncronized color mind games in a badland triple.

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Photo District News wants you to vote

The PDN 2006 Photo Annual is underway, here is spotlight on it and the online gallery starts here. You can vote for your favorites in each category, and you should.

And yes, that Chris Buck image of Steve Martin is a homage to the Picasso portrait of years ago.

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Ikea dresses up bus stops. Again.

Curbed have admired some Ikea couch-clad bus stops, the idea sprung from Deutsch/N.Y. and iDeutsch. However, it is far from the first time Ikea went out and funished a city in general and bus stops in particular to make a point.

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Forsbergs vs Berghs, arranging demonstrations to advertise

Revolutionizing new ideas - not!

The Demonstration I told you about the other day, done by advertising students from Berghs for Svea Kebab (which is located across the street from the school) isn't quite as an original idea as one might think. The funny lies in that their opposing school, Forsbergs school of advertising, also arranged a demonstration. This made me laugh. As badland readers know, there is nothing new under the sun.

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Widespread concern about the "battle of the sexes"

A total of 17 complaints, lead the Advertising Standards Complaints Board to review a Toyota Rav 4 ad by Saatchi & Saatchi. It was found to have "breached three principles in its code of ethics: that advertisements should be prepared with a due sense of social responsibility, should not contain anything likely to cause serious or widespread offence, and should not contain dangerous practices which encourage a disregard for safety." They also claim that 17 complaints constitutes evidence of widespread concern.

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Tango Balls... (No, it's not the Bravia spot. Look closer...)

Brilliant spoof of Sony Bravia spot. Done by the guys over at Clemmow Hornby Inge.

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Adland: 
 

Apple's real benefits over the PC

What a surprise...Apple's new spots are already being spoofed.

Check out the the spoofs titled "Crap", "Porn", and "Sharing" inside.

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People dancing in shapes, times two, BT vs Het Nieuwsblad.

Sqaure eyed super adgrunts and other adnerds probably recall last years BT advert "talk talk" where people seen from above dance into different shapes, such as a rolling pram, a couple of children and a heart pierced by an arrow. Re-see it here at chiadvertising.

Seems that the crew who can dance like this have a great agent, because we found another ad where they do the same thing thanks to a friendly adnerd named Joost. Talk Talk 'shapes' shameless copy inside.

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The way things go - Der Lauf Der Dinge

You probably recall the fuss kicked up by Swiss artists Peter Fischli and David Weiss back in 2003, as the Honda Cog spot created by Wieden & Kennedy was a wee bit too close to their award-winning 1987 masterpiece, Der Lauf Der Dinge (The Way Things Go).
Well, for all of you who never saw the way things go, here you go, 29 min 45 sec of things going..and going..and going...


For comparisons sake:

The Honda Cog
advert is in the archive, weighs 8.6 MB - super adgrunts can watch it.

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Knorr vs. McDonald's

These two spots sound alike to us, but what the bleep do we know?

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Bloody hell, you can't show a half-full beer in Canada

The ad story that just won't die this month seems to be Australia's "Where the bloody hell are you?" campaign. It launched the last week of February and was created by M&C Saatchi in Sydney.

First, the ad was restricted in the UK for the word "bloody", which was eventually overturned after the Australian Tourism Minister, Fran Bailey, took a trip to London to defend the use of the word in the campaign.

Then Canada's CBC restricted the spot during family broadcasts for the ad for the use of "hell." Now, they are asking for the ad to be edited to remove a shot showing a half-full pint of beer.

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Bloody is now bloody OK for OZ

The British restriction on the Australian tourism ad "Where the bloody hell are you?" which was not allowed to run in its original form because of the use of "bloody" has been reversed. The Australian Tourism Minister, Fran Bailey, flew to London in the hopes of saving the campaign.

"I am pleased that common sense prevailed and the regulators realised the campaign was intended to be cheeky, friendly and very Australian," Bailey told reporters.

I doubt the Australians are that upset though since the TV ban provided a ton of free publicity for Tourism Australia, which said it had created "an on-line traffic jam" around the A$180 million campaign.

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