Oh dear, we found another copy for the copied copier service advert.

Well, the "I've seen that before"-bell has rung loud and clear,there's another recent poster series for a copy-shop that sold it's service by simply copying stuff that happened to be in the vicinity of the poster. Like park benches.

Campbell's vs. Branston

Sometimes, the left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing. But if you lived in Badland, your hands are in total sync.

Arkitektkopia makes copies a breeze - but is their campaign a copy?

I'm unsure where to place this one, Arkitektkopia has released a very creative campaign - the media itself is quite fun - on the streets of Stockholm right now. The idea is simple, since Arkitektkopia provides great copies, the ads are simply copies of things found on and off the streets in the hood around Stureplan (which is Stockholm's Madison Avenue).

For example, rain drains. Which one is live and which one is memorex? (read more). Hat tip to Swedish adforum Bold for the Arkitektkopia campaign.

Coke vs. Monroe College

Sing. Sing a song. Sing out loud. Sing out strong. Sing of good things, not badland!

Not so sweet returns for The Richmond Times-Dispatch

Photo District News Online tells the story of twin magazine cover shots and headlines which ends sadly in one photographer getting canned. The two covers shows a stack of three candy pieces against a white background - a photographic solution so tried and true that Clinique made entire campaigns out of the "style". What is odder, in my humble opinion, is the similarities of headlines - the Style Weekly headline was "Sweet return," while the Times-Dispatch headline was "A Sweet Return." Brainsync!

Using crack whores to sell French magazines.

Last year the London Metropolitan Police ran a poster campaign against drugs showing the effects of crack on a womans face - BBC news has larger versions of the mugshots.
While some argued that the images were a privacy violation, the woman wasn't in the UK, the images were a series of her booking photographs in the United States over the course of ten years, and as such are public record.

This is the British ad campaign is depicted top.

Now, in France there's a new magazine called Choc magazine, a 'presse a sensation' meaning it's cheap tabloid journalism worse than the Sun has to offer. They launched with the same images as their ad camapign - causing governmental agencies and charities to denounce the mag from day one. It's one thing to use the images to demonstrate the long term effects of drug abuse and street life in hopes of scaring some viewers straight, it's quite another to use it sell tabloids.
(inside is a screenshot of Choc's homepage)

A Good Way To Wind Up In Badland

In 2004, BETC Euro RSCG, Paris and director Phillippe Andre headed to Australia and shot a rather spiffy spot for Peugeot featuring a city full of toy cars which were, of course, no competition for the Peugeot 407. They even received a couple of Clios for their efforts. And after the production, the fully functional "toy" cars were transported to Europe for display in the Peugeot showroom in Paris.

A year later, take a look at what Mobil 1 cranked out. (links for Superadgrunts only)

Making (logo) copies an art

Bad Design Kills have found a treasure of logo-twins, and show them all off in the Logoworks rip-off collection.

Yo-ho-ho and a badland of rum - Say hello to Captain Malibu.

Wayyy back in 2004, Malibu Rum came out with a television campaign based around a nicely twisted concept of Caribbean island life meshed with urbanite quirks. Groovy. Later, in 2005, Captain Morgan came out with its own television campaign for their Parrot Bay brand extension of rums, using a concept that just might have a few of you experiencing déjà vu. Well, it's time for them to take the badland litmus test.

Film fans or ad fans?

A friendly adgrunt in our hood tipped us to this pair - "Pick up todays Politiken paper" he said.. "doesn't that ad for the film fest look a little like those Stella ads?".....

Lets have a look shall we?

Shutterspeed makes shutterbugs make films

Something about great cameras seems to inspire photographers to make films. Films shot with their still cameras. Yep.

Right now there's a short film by Patryk Rebisz called "between you and me" shot entirely with his Canon EOS 20D available on his website.

Patryk probably hasn't seen the award winning commercial Nikon F5 Granny on Pier back in 1997, which was also shot with the Nikon still camera alone in order to show off how fast that shutter speed is - but you can. Funny how the idea god works isn't it? In one film it's the selling point of the camera, in the other it's just a technique to tell a story with.

Yellow Pages and Target split image concepts

Starting in the spring of 2004 Peterson Milla Hooks, an ad agency in Minneapolis, created a "Wants Needs" campaign that used split images. In Novemeber of 2004, AMV BBDO in London created a campaign for the Yellow Pages using the same technique for ads on the Underground.

Computer platform wars in advertising.

The battle between Microsoft and Apple rages on. These past few weeks more than one eyebrow was raised when Microsoft published a rather strange ad pointing out that people were entering peoples houses through teeny tiny wires.

Real Spoofs of genius!

Mr Pocky Snack inventor, Mr anime fan - yes, the real american genius (or heroes as they used to be called before it went out of fashion) ads for Bud Light have been deservedly spoofed, as Po

Technicolor yawns

Clearly I'm not the only one to notice as proven by meganificent's comment - the technicolor yawns are like all other yawns, very contagious. Lets see some triplet rainbows in ads, read more.

ASA wants proof prayer heals for SA church ad

The Solid Rock church in Johannesburg has been running ads claiming that "people are now getting healed of Aids or cancer, diabetics, broken bones, heart, back and many other problems are instantly healed in the name of Jesus Christ."

A complaint against unsubstantiated claims was brought to the ASA which has banned the ad until the church can produce irrefutable evidence to support those claims.

Solid Rock pastor Johan van Wyk said the advert was placed in a Johannesburg community newspaper after two people were carried into the church dying of Aids.

"They walked out of our church and walked back in the next week. The church presented sworn affidavits of healings, including a doctor's certificate in the case of a congregant who has been healed of Aids."

Brand New EU logo looks like an old logo.

At BBC news we find another Badlander-logo pair. It's the brand new EU presidency logo that has swans flying in a V formation..

Helium Huffing Ad Bannage

This week was a banner week in the UK for banning radio ads that have helium related themes.

One radio ad was for MasterCard. It featured a man singing over the phone in a high-pitched voice to his girlfriend and followed their "priceless" campaign. There were two complaints.

The other spot was for Travelocity, a part of the "Alan Whicker" Traveling Gnome campaign. In the ad the gnome is enjoying a ride in a helium balloon, and he says "speaking of helium it's the perfect stuff to help me tell you all about Travelocity in a short commercial." There was one complaint.

(Read on for more...)

Honda vs. Hewlett-Packard

You're one in a million...unless you live in badland.

Nike is paying homage to... Or plagiarising?

Minor Theft - over at Pitchforkmedia one can see comparisons between Minor Threats cover art and a current Nike poster. Both carry the high contrast image of a bald shaven guy sitting with his head in his arms in a staircase. Both have the words running down the right in block text: "Minor Threat" vs "Major Threat".

"You don't need a degree in graphic design to notice the similarities here. They're the fucking same. Oh, wait-- one is blue, not red. And Major, not Minor. And there are some Nike logos tossed in there. This brings to mind an interview with Vanilla Ice, defending the differences between "Ice Ice Baby" and "Under Pressure" ("dun dun dun duh-duh-duh dun" vs. "DUN dun dun dun duh-duh-duh dun")."

A rep from Discord records replied when PitchforkMedia asked "Did Nike ask permission" with :

"No, they stole it and we're not happy about it. Nike is a giant corporation which is attempting to manipulate the alternative skate culture to create an even wider demand for their already ubiquitous brand. Nike represents just about the antithesis of what Dischord stands for and it makes me sick to my stomach to think they are using this explicit imagery to fool kids into thinking that the general ethos of this label, and Minor Threat in particular, can somehow be linked to Nike's mission. It's disgusting."

The Major Threat Skateboard tour dates can be found on Nike's site Nike skateboarding where the "homage" artwork serves as a punk-nod tour poster. Is it parody? Is it a homage? Is it a lazy art director? What do you think? Thanks to salmonberry who emailed me the pitchfork link and hat tip to me3dia at Metafilter for the gossip.
UKTV 'crack house' posters condemned

Local councillors didn't see the funny in the billboards for UKTV's 'Extreme Makeover: Home Edition', and want them taken down.

The posters depicts a framed floral cross-stitch with headlines like "Bless this crack house", "There's no place like home for a gangland slaying" and "Home Sweet Derelict Trailer Park".

The leader of Lambeth Council, councillor Peter Truesdale said that the campaign should be stopped and said: "Crack houses should be closed down, not glorified on billboards. We have a zero-tolerance policy on crack houses and this kind of advertising is poking fun at the work of the council and police."

Ogilvy Düsseldorf – No real beauties.

Dove soap’s European-wide "Campaign for Real Beauty" has taken on a local twist in Düsseldorf, Germany. The people next door at the local Ogilvy & Mather office have not only sold their souls to their client, but their bodies as well. These local posters are being used in conjunction with the real "Real" campaign and placed on bus stop shelters. The headline reads: "They’re not models, just soft Dove admen from Ogilvy Düsseldorf."

Previously on Dove's Real Beauty campaign:

One of the most recycled non-profit adverts?

Seven years ago, this Rude Food film made the rounds. Orginially it was called "Hot Dinner". Now, the Vegetarian Society is using it, again, as a viral to promote National Vegetarian Week in the UK. An April 1st press release from the group claims that "members of The Vegetarian Society are up in arms after discovering that the long established charity is secretly promoting pornographic material under the guise of National Vegetarian Week."

In it, a spokesperson for The Vegetarian Society was quoted as saying:

“ We are deeply sorry for causing offence to any of our members. Unfortunately the link was sent out to a few people by accident, we are investigating an internal leak as we had planned to use the film as a bit of fun for our staff in celebration of National Vegetarian Week. Now that the website is in the public domain we can only say that we hope that there are other vegetarians out there that actually enjoy this sort of thing.”

Leaked? Yeah years ago.

Read on for more...

Bars a plenty for mobile phone companies

This badlander is a confusing story. Bars seem to be a very common theme in mobile communications. And there's evidence that either these ads are all being influenced by one international company, GSM, or if Cingular and Telefonica are just copying concepts.

Read on for more...

Citroen CV2 - dancing citroen spoof

Alex Mallinson over at X-bam illustration decided one day to mock that dancing Citroen ad and got busy. In five days he managed to create the bulk of it all, 16 hours of car/robot construction, another 16 hours animating that, 8 hours creating the carpark and then set it to render which took 8 days. So, in less than two weeks he managed to make this film, which mocks the original quite well.

The original Citroen "transform".

Virtual Bartender 1, and 2 and now 3.

Woopsie, looks like the ever-so popular Virtual Bartender Chicks (and version number two) from beer.com have been re-done by Bavaria beer in Brazil (say that ten times fast after drinking ten of them).
To view the Brazilian version, hop in to their site and click the babe on the top, leave your 'name' and 'email' and choose where you live from a drop-down menu. Then off you go.

Logo twins mean very different things

Over at Bold user Bedford spotted a very funny set of logo twins which mean very different things.

Sex shop spot banned by Canadian TV

This ad from the folks at Bos was recently banned by Telecaster (the agency responsible for approving TV ads in canada).

Hyundai Sonata & Subaru advert, Badland targets

Adgrunt nubetre tips us to this pair of Badland commercials where cars only use two tires at a time. nubetre reckons:

Maybe it's just to me, but I see a distinct similarity in premise, if not message. Also, note Subaru's "Professional Drivers, Do not attempt" disclaimer.
Yep, there is a distinct similarity alright - don't you think?

Hyundai the half car summer 2004
vs

Subaru the skirting mobile
this spring. Hmmmm......
Viagra gets rough with Virgin - forces them to pull ad

Aaah, too many pun possibilities here, pun-overload!

Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R has ticked off Pfizer and Viagra by using their familiar little blue bill shape as a visual in an ad poster for Virgin airlines. In their poster, the pill is inscribed with "Virgin" and the copy reads: "Virgin Upper Class Suite. The biggest, firmest, longest bed in business."

Pfizer didn't see the funny in that and complained saying the diamond shape is trademarked and these Virgin posters are infringing on Pfizer's intellectual property. Virgin has agreed to remove the posters within the next few days. Another Virgin poster they'll no longer run reads: "We're bigger than BA in the bedroom department".


click on image for a larger version.

Mince Mary advert the most complained about ad last year.

The UK advertising watchdog Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) announced our favorite toplist on Tuesday by releasing their annual report.

Bottle voodoo between Bavaria and Brutal Fruit

In the old Marca Bavaria ad, made in Canada 2003 which created a stir back then, a man on a beach notices that how he moves the bottle affects how the beach babe moves.....

Well, it looks like a bar babe has copped that guys move.

Cult cleaner ad for Cillit Bang is banned!

As if to cement it's mythical cult status Cillit Bang has lucked out completely and gotten their ad banned by the ASA.
It is the scene with the penny that is causing trouble, the advert claims that it can make "an old penny good as new" in only 15 seconds. The Advertising Standards Agency said the claim was "exaggerated" and that the advert was "oversimplified and misleading". It ruled it must not be shown again in that form. The Cillit Bang company defended itself by saying that the voiceover unintentionally "oversimplified the chemistry". Too little too late.
Cillit Bang's logo is available on a range of badges and t-shirts as ironic hipster kid gear, and will probably only become more hip now.

Ad awarded an Swedish Golden Egg accused of theft/brain sync.

No rest for the wicked, they say, so here is yet another pair of ads ready for Badland. A tip from an adgrunt who prefers to remain anonymous in this case leads us to twin ads for the same Nintendo client!

"The winner of a Golden Egg (Guldägg)in print/magazine category - Nintendo by Lowe Brindfors - is based on the same idea McCann Norway did three years ago. For the same client."
Adidas vs Douwe Egberts

"Don't you ever get tired of pairing up those Badlanders?" some people say. "Don't you know that twin ideas can just happen?" protest the defensive ones.
Sure I know that, I say that, and sure sometimes I'd rather have an ice-lolly than make another Badland pair... But then again there are other times when I just roll my eyes and wonder who was the lazy-ass bastard to fall so deep into demo-love that you can hardly tell the copy apart from the original.

Like this time.

Taco Bell vs. Dr. Pepper

Those skinny jeans

Running shoes and cranberry juice. Who would have thought they had something in common. According to both Reebox (a.k.a. RBX) and Oceanspray the reasons for working out and eating right apparently all come down to one thing, getting into your skinny jeans.

(there's more!)

Sofa King ad slogan banned

The Scotsman reports that a furniture shop's poster with the slogan "sofakinggood" was banned today. The Advertising Standards Authority banned the poster stating it could be viewed as containing swearing and "was likely to cause serious or widespread offence". It received seven complaints.

The company had argued it used the slogan because it sold sofas, its customers considered it to be "king" and it was "good" at its trade.

This isn't a new thing for this company either. Above is an ad from last year using the same idea for their company slogan - "Sofa King Low"

Toyota vs Volkswagen

The same idea sells two different cars on two sides of the pond. Watch American Toyota versus British Volkswagen. Adgrunt Kgeiger spotted these, where both cars are so inexpensive the owners think they got a great deal through a mistake. The question is who is the cheap one?

Marmite Blob Advert Restricted

Media Guardian reports that the Marmite "Love it or Hate it" Blob spot was pulled from kids' TV. The ad, created by DDB London, spoofs the classic 1950s sci-fi horror film The Blob has been banned from kids' TV and TV shows kids' might be viewing (like Pop Idol) because it gave children nightmares. And it terrified two- and three-year-olds into refusing to watch television, the Advertising Standards Authority said.

The ad shows a large blob of Marmite squelching its way through the center of a busy main street, with some who try to out run it and others who happily run towards it and dive in head first. The ad can be viewed here at Marmite's web site.

French court bans "last supper" ad that offended catholics

When it first appered in Italy last month the city of Milan didn't take too long to ban the poster from appearing there. Now that the campaign reached France the Catholic Church there sprung into action at once and took the offending ad to court. The judge ruled that the ad was "a gratuitous and aggressive act of intrusion on people's innermost beliefs". The prosecuting lawyer agreed: "Tomorrow, Christ on the cross will be selling socks."

Dunlop versus Mercedes

What the butterfly never learned is that the fastest way between point A and point B is in a straight line.
Seems that creatives have learned how to illustrate with that line between point A and point B. Here are two campaigns that rely on the same execution and idea, as the execution is the idea. One campaign is for tyres , the other for luxury cars.

Blackspot sneaker ads banned yet again

Blackspots advertising campaign seems to be centered around getting banned, something that happens a lot to AdBusters ads actually, they have more than ten years of experience in getting ads refused from big networks. It's the reasons for not airing the ads that really crack us up though, the 15 second animated ads were rejected by the fux at FOX and the empty MTV because, as FOX put it, they are "too jumpy".

Who knew, jumpy is now too risque, and that's even without any breasts or nipples involved. Does FOX think the fuzzy animation has some strange hypnotic powers beyond advertisings usual persuasion?
Maybe they think it's like that video in the Japanese horror flick "Ringu" and it has special powers...... Read more to see the "jumpy" animation.

Delta vs. Volkswagen

Karma, karma, karma chameleon.

Superadgrunts, click read more to watch two commercials, one concept.

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