Toyota Corolla - Style Never Goes Out Of Style / Elevate - (2013) :60 (USA)

 
 

Toyota Corolla - Style Never Goes Out Of Style / Elevate - (2013) :60 (USA)

Biscuit director Andreas Nilsson takes viewers through a time warp in this new spot for the Toyota Corolla via Saatchi & Saatchi LA. Showcasing hot trends from every decade since the Corolla was born in the 60s, it’s clear that the Corolla will never go out of style -- unlike some of those regrettable fashion choices.

*chuckle* Oh yes, regrettable fashion choices. Regrettable commercial choices, åh, Andreas din stackars jävel vilket helvete att försöka få styr på den här icke-idén. Where do I begin with this mess? It's as confused as the fashions shown in it. First, everyone is dancing. Why are we dancing around cars? In the 60s it's black and white, even though the Peacock logo is famously colorful because NBC aired in color in the 50s. There are some good edit ideas between the skateboarding 80s kids into the 90s grunge-fest, and Dr DJ with his pal Doofus DJ do well as comedic relief in the 70s and 80s, but that's probably why I'm confused.
This ad doesn't know what it wants to tell me. It doesn't know if it's funny, or if it wants to be nostalgic-epic. It's as confused as those knee-high socks worn with nurses-clogs. Once we leave the past and drive out on todays Sesame Street populated with American Apparel fashion rejects, set to the tune of Skrillex meets Swedish House Mafia in a blender, I am left with a longing for David Bernal's dancing and Mint Royal's music in that VW ad because that ad had an idea.
Also, as cute as that swooosh-up pop-lock move everybody does in the end is, it feels like 2005 not 2013. Then there's the voice-over, the crowning naffness. Sounding like an intern on valium is reading it, it cements the too-many-chefs feeling this ad gives me, with the seal of yet-another-piece that doesn't fit with the rest.
Maybe that's what the ad wants to tell me: Toyota Corolla is confused! Toyota Corolla has now been around so long it suffers dementia and can't tell a brand story in 60 seconds without losing its way and mumbling along into irrelevant digressions: "....And everyone wore primary colors and lived happily ever after."*Falls asleep on the porch smelling of old person and lemonade.*

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi LA
Executive Integrated Producer: Margaret Nickerson
Senior Integrated Producer: Tamsin Prigge-Blue
Executive Creative Director: Margaret Keene
Creative Director: Raymond Hwang
Creative Director: Seth Rementer
Associate Creative Director: Mike Czako
Executive Director of Integrated Production: Tanya LeSieur
Art Producer: Angee Murray
Associate Integrated Producer: Alex Granieri
Associate Producer: Dan Paquin

Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks
Director: Andreas Nilsson
Managing Director: Shawn Lacy
Executive Producer: Colleen O'Donnell
Producer: Youree Henley
Director of Photography: Toby Irwin
Production Designer: Floyd Albee

Editorial Company: Arcade LA
Editor: Geoff Hounsell
Producer: Kirsten Thon-Webb

Visual Effects: The Mill LA
Producer: Christina Thompson

Commercials: 
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Comments

I'm sorry, but I have to go on. Why is there a Toyota on a grunge-stage? This makes no sense unless this is someone garage, which its clearly not. That 'lightning' from the 80s dancers seems like such an afterthought, put in as a SPX when someone in the editing suite noticed that the dance-move itself didn't manage to pull the old uninteresting car in, from being a wallflower in the background. Why is everyone dancing. Why is everyone dancing? Wtf does dance have to do with it? They're not using this dancing to communicate updated like the VW GTI ad did. There's no there, there. What are we doing here, people, and why didn't anyone stop you?

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