A classic case of A and B ideas.

 
 

A classic case of A and B ideas.

My old tutor Gillard used to rip our ads to shreads if we resorted to the left hand page "A" and the right hand page "B" idea. Here's a classic case of two A and B's with similar message.

Client: Rolling Stone Magazine
Agency: Fallon McElligott
AD/CW : Unknown
Line reads:
Perception - Reality

Seen In:
Everywhere, including the CA annual of 94.

Client: SIF
Agency: Jerlov & Co
AD/CW: Dunno
Line reads:
Myth - Fact
Seen In:
Swedish magazines fall 1999

This was mailed in by a Adland pal, John in Sweden,

To me it looks more like a classic case of 'A and B advertising' as my tutor John Gillard called it. You know the kind, you've had the ideas as well.We all have! Take any product, show it in a bad light on the left, and a good light on the right, as in 'Either this --OR-- This. ' Or show anything on the left, and hammer home the point on the right. See what I mean? I'm terrible at explaining this... (some people have a way with words and others ...uhm.. thingie..) Any ads involving two steps before the punter gets it is a case of A and B advertising. I won't be as strict as my tutor and say it should never been done, but I do agree with him that it should be avoided at all costs, as it is better to hammer home your point in one go. Whammo. Course that the hard part...

Anyway, what makes these two examples interesting is the headlines. Perception -reality vs. Myth - fact. Very similar headlines in a way.. aren't they? Well. The scan was too grungy to read the body-copy when I got it, so I really don't know what point either one of these two ads are trying to hammer home. I think it's a case of A and B ads (as in, it has been done to death since the fifties, stop it already) rather than a true rip-off. What do you think? Hit that comment button! C'mon!

Badland: 

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