Global Bridge may cause Global ad trouble

 
 

Global Bridge may cause Global ad trouble

New Zealand ad-man Dene Waring woke up one morning tired of his ad-life. He concieved of the "world worst business plan" offering discount multimedia services from his 65-year-old 39ft kauri ketch the Wayfarer and embarked on an adventure.

Formerly the Creative Director for Taylormade Media, Mr Waring, his wife, Pam, and three youngest children abandoned shore life in March and embarked on an adventure to take "our skills where they are needed most". You got it - Pro Bono advertising with a new twist. ....

Now with contracts with Wellington Zoo, World Wildlife Fund and the Conservation Department, the Wayfarer and the crew are set to remain tied up at Chaffers Marina till till "the work we take on has been completed".

Commenting on his idea, 45-year-old Mr Waring said he had simply grown tired of the "old way" of doing advertising.

"I decided I just wasn't happy with the way I was utilising my skills.

"I grew tired of pushing the normal consumer advertising model and I was frustrated by having to turn down requests from good causes who had no resources to pay for the work."

"Wondering what I could do if I utilised my skills but took money - to a large extent but not completely, of course - out of the equation, I came up with what is fiscally the world's worst business plan but ethically, business at its best."

Working with whatever good causes he deems appropriate, he provides three tiers of services, he says.

"First, I work for free or near enough to it."

"Second is the 'grossly underfunded' category where I'd charge, say, $300 or $400 for a job that might in the competitive world cost up to $10,000."

"Then there is the 'let's be fair' category where I charge normal rates to firms who can afford it and make an ethical decision to use me so their fees can subsidise the first two tiers."

Offering a wide range of media, design and advertising services Mr Waring realises he may receive flak from competitors who feel he is undercutting industry norms.

"I'm waiting for trouble," he says. "I predict the first reaction will be anger at being undercut but I believe the end result of our work will be more agencies doing ethical work."

Adland: 

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