Microsoft switch goes sour

Microsoft pulled a switch. To be more specific, they posted a cute ad on their sales pages supposedly written by a freelance copywriter who switched after eight years of mac-dom over to XP. It beat the same drum as the apple switch campaign but with a lot less personality. An entire personality it seems.

The slashdot community thought they recognized the woman, and found her to be a Getty images stock photo. Was this a testimonial without a testimonee? That ain't legal!

The woman in the ad
is this stock image gal
- we wonder why they didn't use Gates-owned Corbis instead.

Wired picked up on it - so did the Seattle Post - both found that Valerie G. Mallinson, a representative of a public relations company hired by Microsoft , is the mysterious convert.

At the time of this writing, you can still find the page in
google's cache .

The copy of the ad told about how easy it was to switch:

"Yes, it's true. I like the Microsoft® Windows® XP ...

To my surprise, the process of switching was as easy as the marketing hype had promised. I was up and running in less than one day, Girl Scout's honor. First, let me tell you more about why I converted.

I am a freelance writer; I demand the best in mobile computing. There's a much greater choice of portable computers and features, for less money, on the Windows platform. My laptop came with 512 MB of RAM, a 15" screen, a DVD player, and Windows XP Home Edition preinstalled, for $450 less than a comparable iBook. My recommendation is to go straight to Windows XP Professional; the extra features for mobile users are worth it. See Which Edition is Right for You? for more information.

Microsoft Internet Explorer 6 does more for me than Netscape Navigator ever did, and I am a surfing addict. Searches are faster; the History feature makes it easier to find that site from last week; and I can name and organize my Favorites any way I want."

Microsoft are now switching marketing tactics.

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Dabitch Creative Director, CEO, hell-raising sweetheart and editor of Adland. Globetrotting Swede who has lived and worked in New York, London, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Stockholm after growing up in Kiruna, Raleigh and Jiddah.