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Credit Karma "Tornado" (2017) :30 (USA)
Credit Karma "Tornado" (2017) :30 (USA)

You know what's scary, finding out your car dealer jacked up your interest rate. Makes you wanna hurl.

Credit Karma "ER" (2017) :30 (USA)
Credit Karma "ER" (2017) :30 (USA)

You know what's stressful. Medical errors, on your credit report. That make everything stressful until they are, wait for it, clear.

Syoss "The Thief" (2017) 1:20 (Switzerland)
Syoss "The Thief" (2017) 1:20 (Switzerland)

Walker Zurich turns a bad hair day into a metaphor. Commuters are getting robbed every day by a nasty thief who steals your morning time.

Atlantis Paradise Island "Come to life" (2017) 1:00 (USA)
Atlantis Paradise Island "Come to life" (2017) 1:00 (USA)

The opening shot of this ad shows an amazing pink sky, reflected in the crystal clear water. This is the cue that every shot in this ad will be as colourful as the islands are by nature.

Welcome to The World Of Playdoh

Oh how fun this must have been to create-- literally. Play-Doh is a nice reminder that while apps and photo editing tools are nice, nothing is better than getting your hands into the mix.

Heart & Stroke Foundation "16 and Under" (2017) 2:35 (Canada)
Heart & Stroke Foundation "16 and Under" (2017) 2:35 (Canada)

john st. takes the piss out of advertising (something that they really really

Misc

Olympic Chainsaw Massacre

Adland: 

NBC contributed the latest example of advertising "standards and practices" hypocrisy when it cut a new Olympics spot from Nike spot off at the knees this week.

The spot, a parody of slasher movies, features runner Suzy Hamilton being chased through the woods by a chainsaw-weilding masked man. The Nike-clad Olympian easily outdistances the psycho, leaving him panting in exhaustion as supers pop up stating "Why sport? You'll live longer."

The network cited an unspecified "number of viewer complaints" as the reason for its flip-flop on the previously approved spot. Once again, advertising is being subjected to scrutiny that programming in the same media is spared from.

Other instances of this type double standard include the Fox Network's objection to a Super Bowl spot featuring a man driven up an elephant's derriere and ABC saying "no" to artificial noses.

It's hard to understand what this network censorship accomplishes other than giving media buyers another reason to shift to cable.

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