The stuff we missed: Fluid hair defends 'abuse ad' with "I was abused" - links & more

 
 

The stuff we missed: Fluid hair defends 'abuse ad' with "I was abused" - links & more

Bat boy wins a tomorrow award. He won't if you beat him to it, remember deadline is October 3rd, if you've created something that points to the future of advertising, get on it. It's not about media, it's about groundbreaking ideas.

The Fluid Salon wife beater ad etc campaign caused a bit of a ruckus this week. Fluid Hair posted this response when news and bloggers took notice.

Boycotting Fluid Hair isn’t going to stop domestic abuse. If it did I, Tiffany Jackson being Sarah Cameron’s creative consultant and close friend would tell you all to boycott and bankrupt her business. Yea that’s right I’m talking to you Ryan Jespersen from Breakfast Television and other select reporters and journalists who in my opinion use a platform that they were blessed with to gain ratings and make more money (no judgment, no hard feelings, just saying). Because if you really wanted to do something about stopping domestic abuse it wouldn’t start with rounding up the pitchfork carrying masses and getting them fired up to boycott a hair salon. In fact it’s probably the last place you would start.

Now everyone and their uncle has weighed in on this campaign, Adweek, Jezebel etc.
Work that matters argues that it could have worked as art, but falls flat on its cynical face as advertising.

If unbranded, this photo essay would make a social statement about the superficiality of a looks-obsessed culture that's falling apart. As an ad campaign, it is sleazy and misjudged because it is cynically selling the very looks-obsessed culture the photos would otherwise be critiquing. The headline transforms it from provocative statement to tasteless joke.


This friday playlist is Real Old Skool, that's new songs arranged for orchestras, cellos, violins and piano.
D&AD interviews Nick Patchitt, otherwise known as nickprints about "London Calling" and inspiration.
Martin Murphy from DraftFCB Chicago shares six simple questions to spot if an ad idea is good, crappy.... or sublime.
Adland: 

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