During the recent holiday season, Publicis Vancouver - inspired by the recent economic recession - opted for a contribution to the local food bank on behalf of their clients. In lieu of a traditional holiday card, paper plates were sent to clients informing them of the donation made. The response was overwhelming and received much praise, including an on-air mention from a local radio station. We bought 7-inch paper plates from a grocery store nearby and put food-shaped stickers on top of each plates by hands.

More plates and credits inside.

Commercials: 

I, honestly, literally did a spit-take when I opened the inbox and was greeted by this huge cake image. Whybin\TBWA explains: A campaign to raise awareness of the long-lasting effects of childhood abuse. Agency Whybin\TBWA Sydney shows that whilst it would be nice if people could just joke and be comfortable about the terrible things that have happened to them, unfortunately they can't.

Commercials: 

After a 35-year career in military recruitment advertising, including the past 13 years as president and co-founder of the agency that begins with the initial of his last name, Doug Laughlin of LM&O Advertising, Inc. today announced his retirement from day-to-day management of his full-service marketing and communications shop.

Doug Laughlin will assume the newly created role of chairman, LM&O Advertising, Inc. as he hands over the agency’s operational reins to son, Chris Laughlin, who is now president, LM&O Advertising, Inc., effective immediately.

Adland: 

This has been haunting me. Where had I seen something similar to this anti-speeding ad sponsored by Kent Police? And then it hit me (I know, I know). Adland, of course, home of the uncomfortable coincidence. The suspect was made in New Zealand, so obviously the English agency wouldn't have seen it. But still - what a turn up, eh?

For quicktime, check Rodney District Council - Haunting Girl - Ambient, New Zealand

Badland: 

There's been a lot of chatter regarding Facebook's new "engagement ads" in the blogosphere (oh, spank me for using that word), for example ReadWriteWeb posted Facebook Plans to sell your data February 1 - and the old paper-press people have also written about this; The Telegraph Network cashes in on friends. Some posts were approriatly paranoid but the best one yet is Inside Facebook's "Could Facebook Soon Target Advertisements According to Your Mood?". That's creepy.

However the "new" Engagement Ads aren't new at all, and not active as Facebook's communications managed Matt Hicks explains here in a comment

Earlier this week, there were reports, originating from an article in the UK’s 'The Daily Telegraph' newspaper, which suggest that Facebook is doing all sorts of things that it is not doing. Let me explain what announcements and initiatives Facebook has actually undertaken:

At this years’ World Economic Forum, Facebook ran a series of polls during the many panel sessions to provide the Davos audience with real-time insight into the opinions of people outside of the conference. These polls were conducted on Facebook using internal tools. We were very pleased with the reception these polls received at Davos, whose audience is comprised of many world and business leaders. It is important to note that the polls that we ran at the World Economic Forum were not part of a commercially available product for advertisers and should not be confused with Facebook’s Engagement Ads.

Facebook’s Engagement Ads have been available since September. Early last week we separately announced that we were testing a new type of Engagement Ad, which enables advertisers to pose a question within the ad itself. Engagement Ads were not used to run the polls seen at the Davos conference.

Finally, I want to clarify that Facebook has, for many years, allowed the targeting of advertising in a non-personally identifiable way, based on profile attributes. For example, an advertiser could target an ad to male users over 30 years of age who list snowboarding among their interests. However, the advertiser does not receive any data about individual users, and only knows that their ad was shown to a certain number of users who fit the category. Further, Facebook is not selling any users’ information for market research purposes. Nothing has changed in our approach, and Facebook is committed, as always, to connecting users in a trusted environment.

Matt Hicks
Corporate Communications, Facebook

I've tried to find a way of contacting the people working for facebook without having to join facebook and I've come up short, so that comment will have to do. The irony aye? Why am I not (re)joining facebook? Unlike some people I know who gripe when advertisers get a hold of their data I don't put my data on places where it's dead obvious that the data will be chunked up and fed to advertisers in the first place. Facebook was never around just for the sheer fun of it people. If you don't like every sock-change and party-image post that you're making turn into an advertising opportunity, just opt-out from the start by not playing on facebook. Easy. I know, "everyone else is doing it", sure sure. But then five million flies eat shit. Doesn't mean you should. If all your friends jumped off a cliff....? ;-)

Note: Readwriteweb updated their facebook news with How a Facebook "Sentiment Engine" Could Be Huge.

Adland: 

A.k.a The dangers of going through the inbox at four in the morning. So, I read The Denver Egotists mail first and made this post last night Computertan viral makes no sense, when I should have taken a moment to you know, sleep or something. What had arrived earlier in my inbox explains the whole thing and asks me politely to join in on it if I wish. It explains who created this viral website, and why, with background info - and in my newly coffinated (hehe) state I realize that posting the email without asking if I could first would be downright rude. So I ring up Adam in London and ask if I may quote these bits. He emails me back a moment later with a yes - the cat is out of the bag at this point anyway.

Why are we doing this?
SKCin wish to highlight the dangers of skin cancer and the brutal fact that this most common form of cancer kills at least 5 people a day in the UK. We believe the site will appeal to an audience and attract visitors SKCin would never usually be able to reach.
 
-  -
 
We would love for you to pass this hoax on, it is for a very good cause after all and everyone working on it has done so for free.

So there you have it people, the sender of the viral is working to inform the public about skin cancer. Do pass the site Computertan.com on to that oompah-loompah looking girl in your office though, she might need a nudge to stop abusing the tanning bed. Skin cancer is serious stuff.

Adland: 

Another Bud Light radio ad starring Charlton Heston that aired prior to the Real American Heroes campaign. USA

Commercials: 

Our pals over at The Denver Egotist sent us an email summing up their thoughts succinctly with a single huh?. They are wondering what the heck the point is since "no where in the video or in the accompanying site does McCann Erickson ever come out and take credit as the creator of the idea. What’s the point of the whole thing? " McCann did this? ORLy? Why? Is it a self-promo or a viral for some poor paying client? Is this one of those things where the point will be revealed in three weeks when I've already moved on to another shiny object? Because I promise y'all I won't be paying attention then.

http://www.computertan.com/

ComputerTan, the worlds first online tanning service, offers a deep, long-lasting tan from the convenience of your computer. ComputerTan's revolutionary technology developed and patented in California, USA, remotely manipulates the electrical impulses delivered to the Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps present in every computer monitor, which transmit different wavelengths of light, from Infra-Red to Ultra-Violet. ComputerTan can control the level, intensity and exposure times of this light according to a persons skin profile and usage history.

Adland: 

It's official, the Doritos ad with the most votes in USA TODAY's Super Bowl Ad Meter was the "Crystal ball" Doritos ad reports USAToday.

Gee, if I had only known that a ballbusting groin-shot joke could garner me a million dollars! I've done that! As usual though, way too early, my kick in the balls was created 1995. I feel cheated now. *pout*

Seriously though, this quote should be a nice piece of flamebait:

Rick Condos of Goodby Silverstein & Partners, the agency that helped launch the Super Bowl contest and its website, said the winning Doritos ad shows how content created by consumers has come into its own.

"We actually saw this year how technology is helping consumers create things to the point you don't know what's consumer-generated and what's not," says Condos."


The jammy bastards who won the million are not forgetting their homies.

They're also going to give some cash to the ad's cast and crew, who got only free food for the day-long shoot.

Aw. That's right guys, remember who helped you get there.

Pages