The all new Honda Insight launches with campaign that says it's the “Hybrid for Everyone”. They have posters, commercials, celebs and of course, even a blog. Posting the release in full here.

A fully integrated national advertising campaign for the launch of the all-new Honda Insight begins March 16. The Honda Insight defies hybrid conventions by being inclusive and affordable. The strategy developed by Honda’s long-standing agency of record, RPA, communicates the down-to-earth, democratic “hybrid for everyone” concept with upbeat, optimistic imagery among a diverse collection of people.

The campaign targets consumers who want the benefits of a hybrid, but don’t want to sacrifice fun, style and sportiness.

“The launch of the Insight marks a new day for hybrids. The Insight’s fun-to-drive performance, versatile and fuel-efficient hybrid technology is reflected throughout the national ad campaign and invites everyone to consider a hybrid,” said Tom Peyton, senior manager, national advertising, American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Commercials: 

Okay, so judging the One Show is a great honor. And, of course, it's incredible to be surrounded by a group of people who are so passionate about their work and dedicated to their craft. But honestly, it's also kind of a drag. I mean, we slugged through almost 300 entries today.

Short rationale: Creative thinkers such as Stefan Sagmeister, Paula Scher and Milton Glaser teach classes at the School of Visual Arts.
This campaign reflects that tradition by encouraging people everywhere to "Think" while also giving them a place to write down their thoughts.
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Ah, neat, KNARF New York has made lined papers out of our beloved idea-receiving objects at hand everywhere, like the good old napkin, toilet paper rolls (yes, using toilet paper as ad media just like crumpler did in October last year I predict coupons on TP by 2010), even sugar packets and tray liners. Nice idea, nice looking execution and thanks for all that lined paper I totally need. Check out the other executions and credits inside.

Commercials: 
Death Cab for Cutie - Grapevine Fires - music video

Crossroads' directorial duo Walter Robot's dynamic and inventive visual style is the driving force behind a trio of uniquely inspired music videos for Grammy award-winning recording artists Gnarls Barkley, French-born DJ Vitalic, and Death Cab For Cutie.

Grapevine Fires, the must see music video for alternative rockers Death Cab For Cutie, is the ingeniously animated story of a boy in search of his brother amidst a wildfire that decimates his neighborhood. This emotive story reflects the autobiographical lyrics of lead singer Ben Gibbons who was caught in the horrific 2007 California wildfires and witnessed the tragedy firsthand.

Gnarls Barkley - "Mystery man" - music video

Crossroads' directorial duo Walter Robot's dynamic and inventive visual style is the driving force behind a trio of uniquely inspired music videos for Grammy award-winning recording artists Gnarls Barkley, French-born DJ Vitalic, and Death Cab For Cutie.

Remember Shepard Faireys bold move which seemed to invent the preemptive lawsuit last month? The Associated Press has responded with a countersuit - and in it they paint Shepard Fairey as a hypocrite who acted in bad faith. And they're calling him a bit of a weasel to boot: adressing last months suit AP says Fairey deliberately cited the wrong AP photo as his source image. The Fairey lawsuit cited a Garcia photo that included both then-Senator Obama and actor George Clooney - not the photograph by Garcia that I'm showing next to Faireys poster here. The AP says this misidentification “can only be understood as a deliberate attempt to obscure the Obama Photo as the true source material for the Infringing Works and to minimize the nature and extent of Fairey’s unauthorized copying of the Obama Photo.”

The countersuit also cites letters that Fairey sent to fellow artist Baxter Orr last year, asking Orr to stop using a design that copied Faireys “Obey” image. “Fairey is hardly a champion of the First Amendment,” the AP says and continue by pointing out that Fairey has made quite a lot of money off the works of others while being “hypocritically and aggressively" in protecting his own intellectual property.

Fairey's defense? The usual “fair use” and “I didn't do it to make money” . (Because derivative work that leaves you broke somehow gets you off the hook?)

Read more at Photo District news: AP Answers Shepard Fairey Lawsuit, Accuses Artist of Infringement
Previously : Shepard Fairey Sues AP Over Obama Poster Dispute

Some have been calling Fairey a plagiarist for a while, see this critique by artist Mark Vallen and also jmacphee response to that article which identifies Fairey's use of the modern advertising tools and language as a great big ad for Fairey himself.

Adland: 

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