Considering that practically everyone has been talking about the huge gash in the floor of the Tate, Doris Salcedo's 3ft deep and 584ft long installation called Shibboleth - affectively known as "Doris' crack" - it was only a matter of time before someone hijacked it to try and crack into the papers with their brand.
London creative team Max Bugoyne and James Beswick did just that.

full glory inside

Commercials: 

Honestly, there were some great shows this year, which means great titles and after a long hard think these are the two titles that Adland (and I) loved the mostest of them all.


Dexter main title design

A mundane morning turns sinister in the hands of Digital Kitchen with their design for Dexter which won a well deserved Emmy. Shaving, cooking eggs, making plunger coffee and even tying shoes all hints as bloody mayhem and mass murdering violence - just like the calm character Dexter himself who is so clean on top but violent right beneath the surface. We have to let this win only because cutting oranges now scares the bejesus out of us. Damn that's good.


Mad Men - Title Sequence - (2007) :30 (USA)

Imaginary Forces directors Mark Gardner and Steve Fuller created a free-fall animation where the falling character is suddenly found reclining in a overly confident pose in the end shot - all surrounded by pretty ads and shiny skyscrapers. The end shot was such an iconic image that it became the branding device of the show. Well done.

See also Adland on Mad Men Episode #1 (Pilot) if you missed it.

Sure, FINE, damn you Kiwis just rub it in you have summer down there while we freeze our bums off up here. Just rub it in won't you. In fact, rub it in with a series of coke pinup posters featuring bikini clad babes frolicking with giant bottles why don't you? Go ahead. See if I care.

Commercials: 

Sad news today as the man who introduced the ad world to animation, and enriched the 50's 60s and 70s with stylishly animated commercials for brands such as Dime Savings Bank, Alka-Seltzer, Green Giant vegetables, Crest toothpaste and Jax Beer and many more - Jack Zander - has driven his BMW bike to the dirt road in the sky.
The New York Times Obituary tells the tale of how Jack got his lucky break

The receptionist stuck her head into the lobby, where Mr. Zander and a friend happened to be sitting.
“Are you fellows animators?” she asked.
Mr. Zander, as he later said in interviews, had no idea what an animator was. But it was the start of the Depression.
“Yes!” he shouted, and so his career began.

CartonBrew has a recent Jack Zander interview from this summer, well worth a read.

One of the great things about Jack, that I think everyone who worked for him would agree on is that he hired and trusted a whole generation of young animators. Jack looked for talent, and didn't care much about age, race, background, whatever. He wasn't a New Yorker by birth, but he really was the quintessential New Yorker in his demeanor. And Jack sent some of the best animators in the business out into the world.
His production company was a great place with great people. And he was a great influence. A guy who encouraged free thinking and artistic expression in a business which for all its creativity, can sometimes stifle expansive thought.
He was a great man, and had a huge impact on advertising.

- says our own adgrunt tod.brody
At Animationjournal we found this quote from Jack on creating commercials:

The art form turned out to be a natural for the tube. First it grabbed the viewer's attention just by the looks. At that time most of the commercials were talking heads or other examples of stand up deliveries. Pretty boring. Along comes the funny pictures and immediately the eye is drawn to the screen. Can t beat that. At that stage of the business all you had to do was make some drawings move. Our audience was there waiting for the message.

The lost 50's cartoon have some images from Jack Zanders work.

Adland: 

Agency : DDB South Africa
Gareth Lessing (Executive Creative Director)
Julie Maunder (Creative Director)
Darren Borrino (Creative)
Kenneth van Reenen (Copywriter)
Stuart Turner (Copywriter)
Prod. Co. : Audio Arts

Commercials: 

Agency : DDB South Africa
Gareth Lessing (Executive Creative Director)
Julie Maunder (Creative Director)
Darren Borrino (Creative)
Kenneth van Reenen (Copywriter)
Stuart Turner (Copywriter)
Prod. Co. : Audio Arts

Commercials: 

Agency : DDB South Africa
Gareth Lessing (Executive Creative Director)
Julie Maunder (Creative Director)
Darren Borrino (Creative)
Kenneth van Reenen (Copywriter)
Stuart Turner (Copywriter)
Prod. Co. : Audio Arts

Commercials: 

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