Sun microsystems ads "too controversial"

The creative generalist tips us to the new SUN campaign that has proven "too controversial" for the Wall Street Journal due to it's language. See Sun's own press release here: Sun Censored but Not Silent. Featuring headlines like: In independant lab tests versus Dell, Engineers concluded it saves 56% in energergy costs. They also concluded; Now that's what we call an ass-whoppin'.
............one wonders what the fuss is about. *yawn*

Adland: 
 

Oh dear, we found another copy for the copied copier service advert.

Well, the "I've seen that before"-bell has rung loud and clear,there's another recent poster series for a copy-shop that sold it's service by simply copying stuff that happened to be in the vicinity of the poster. Like park benches. The guy&gal behind the Arkitektkopia campaign we showed you yesterday is not the only creative team to think of this idea.

This ad was made in Denmark, back in 2001 and grabbed home awards-a-plenty, it started with wining a bronze at Danish award Guldkorn, then got shortlisted at London International and then nabbing a Gold in Montreux.

Badland: 
 

Not all product placements are wanted

The makers of Stinking Bishop cheese are concerned with the effect the placement of their product could have the new Wallace and Gromit film, The Curse of the Were-Rabbit. The Wallace character is a cheese loving fella and in a prior film when he expressed a fondness for "a nice bit of Wensleydale", turnover at that cheesemaker soared.

Adland: 
 

Coca Cola tries to be exclusive

Armchair Media has created some funky new bottles for Coca Cola. They asked 5 design groups from 5 continents to create and share visions of optimism.
Part of the launch includes a website, with the design debut, where to buy and a list of the designers. The bottles will appear at the trendiest lounges and night clubs. (Images inside)

Adland: 
 

ASME not happy about sponsorship between New Yorker and Target

The August 22nd issue of The New Yorker was a first for the magazine, only carrying ads for Target. The illustrated ads were created by more than two dozen artists including Milton Glaser, Robert Risko and Ruben Toledo.

Adage.com reports on backlash by the ASME (American Society of Magazine Editors) claiming that violated society guidelines.

Adland: 
 

Polaris Snowmobiles trailer

Polaris Industries has posted a trailer for their next snowmobile commercial at a microsite called winningperformance.tv. Wait for the outtakes at the end. They're the best part. The assumption is that the actual Watch This spot will be posted on the site soon. Both the trailer and spot (not the site) were created by McKinney out of Durham, NC.

Adland: 
 

The Ad Conceptor

With Advertising Week less than two weeks away, Deutsch has put together The Ad Conceptor to aid in concepting while/if you're off to NYC to check out the festivities.
Hat tip to Anantha Naryan on adlist.

Adland: 
 

Campbell's vs. Branston

Sometimes, the left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing. But if you lived in Badland, your hands are in total sync.

Click here to view the Campbell's spot.
Click here to see the Branston commercial.

Badland: 
 

Arkitektkopia makes copies a breeze - but is their campaign a copy?

I'm unsure where to place this one, Arkitektkopia has released a very creative campaign - the media itself is quite fun - on the streets of Stockholm right now. The idea is simple, since Arkitektkopia provides great copies, the ads are simply copies of things found on and off the streets in the hood around Stureplan (which is Stockholm's Madison Avenue).


For example, rain drains. Which one is live and which one is memorex? (read more). Hat tip to Swedish adforum Bold for the Arkitektkopia campaign.

Badland: 
 

American Idol the most expensive show to advertise on (in the USA)

Yikes, American Idol is now officially No.1 with a $705K price tag on a 30-second spot. AI is the most expensive show on network telly for the second year running, proving that it ain't cheap to be that tacky.

Adland: 

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