Fluid Salon - Look good no matter how often he beats you up. What?

 
 

Fluid Salon - Look good no matter how often he beats you up. What?

The running line in this campaign from Fluid Salon is "Look good no matter what you do" and as Copyranter pointed out "...she's about to get a shiny diamond necklace to match her shiner, so all's well that ends well? Edgy."

Well hey, I don't know much about fashion, but figure a do done in a hair-salon should look a little less like my bed-head after sex, and more like a done do, so that's my first gripe with this campaign - three of the hairdo's just look like over-teased rats nests. The controversial "shiner" ad has gotten them some attention though, and the Edmontonsun reports that they're unapologetic about the image

Store owner Sarah Cameron says the point of the ads is to spark controversy, but they were never meant to target or attack anyone.
"It might strike a chord, but as the way our society and community is getting, we keep tailoring everything because everyone is getting so sensitive," says Cameron.
"Anyone who has a connection or a story behind anything can be upset or have an opinion. We are not trying to attack anyone."

The message is clear. It's all about keeping up appearances. Schedule yourself for a haircut now, it's important to look good when you crash your motorcycle, move dead bodies, spend the day hooking on that funky old mattress in the alleyway, or get beaten up by your spouse.

Fluid

Commercials: 
Country: 
Ad type: 

Comments

I think the campaign is hilarious. I'm running out of sympathy for women who stay with men who beat them. If a fist comes flying at you, move out of the way - like, get your own place and cut ties out of the way.

This campaign might be breaching the Canadian advertising standards.. 14(b)&(d)

"(b) appear in a realistic manner to exploit, condone or incite violence; nor appear to condone, or directly encourage, bullying; nor directly encourage, or exhibit obvious indifference to, unlawful behaviour;
--
(d) undermine human dignity; or display obvious indifference to, or encourage, gratuitously and without merit, conduct or attitudes that offend the standards of public decency prevailing among a significant segment of the population."

Aside from that, I don't see the connection between the nicely coiffed lady moving a dead body, and the rats-nest victim getting a shiny necklace. What's the campaign thought?

Add new comment

Top