marketing mishaps

 

Markee the Sad

 

Juice billboard declares: "Once you go black....."

The trendy black bottle for fruit juices that taste good but are less than appetizing to look at has reached the USA. While German based True Fruits sold their black bottle with the idea of beauty on the inside, which offended some readers, USA based Juice (served here) decided to take another route.

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Atlanta electronic billboard hijacked to show Goatse

Smuggling Goatse into digital billboards is an old school (and gross) hack-prank by now, I know that I've tried it , but seldom as successful as this one.

Adland: 
 

FortaCloud adds lingerie clad woman to hosting offer on twitter = instant retweets

At first glance the image of a woman in lingerie draped across a bed staring seductively at the camera seems so misplaced in a tweet about discounted hosting that one suspects the social media manager slipped the wrong image into the tweet by mistake. Upon further inspection, it seems they've taken a cue from the Protein World twitter trolling tactic, and are aiming to woo the "I like semi-undressed women in my twitter feed" crowd as customers.

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Spotify throws casual sexism into Mother's Day tweet, gets schooled.

"Ahead of #Mothersday, how would you explain Spotify to your mom?" Was the question posted in the now deleted Spotify tweet. As soon as it was tweeted out, people responded offended by the "ageist/sexist" tweet. It's never wise to mess with peoples moms.

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Buzzfeed dubs Bud Light the "rape culture" beer

Remember the Bud Light #Upforwhatever campaign? It rolled out with Ian in the Super Bowl 2014, where he was driven around in a Hummer limo and met a llama named Lily before playing ping pong with Arnold.

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If "grow up Harriet" becomes a meme, blame Protein World

Social media in general and Twitter in particular has become increasingly difficult for brands to find the right tone of voice to use in. It doesn't help either that most people like to use twitter to complain straight to brands, whether they are customers or not, about everything from delayed flights to choice of background color in a brands advertising campaign.

Adland: 
 

Clorox tweets an emoji joke about bleach, stains own reputation

In yet another twitter-incident that is sure to make clients even more wary of ever allowing anything to be said on social media without a few hundred focus groups & meetings watering down any semblance of an idea, Clorox managed somehow to come off as weirdly racist with their recent emoji tweet. Their now deleted tweet read: "New emojis are alright but where's the bleach." and attached was the above emoji-picture where a bottle of Clorox is made up from lipstick stains, pigs, sheep, water drops, paw prints, fish and babies - and curiously the numbers 7 8 9.

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True Fruits Smoothies non-apology for "ugly girl friend" black bottle smoothie annoys vegans

As we reported earlier, True Fruits smoothies experienced a very negative reaction to the design & text on their black bottle smoothie, but True Fruits refused to apologise for the tone of voice the brand has decided to employ. The black bottle is opaque, because while the blend of fruits in it taste great the mix makes for an unappetizing look, making their usual design of clear bottles an unwise choice.

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True Fruits Smoothies won't apologize for "ugly girl friend" black bottle smoothie

True Fruits Smoothies in Germany has released a fruit juice mix in a black bottle where there's a point to the oblique design. The smoothie looks unappetizing, but is tasty. So the text on the bottle actually compares this conundrum to an ugly girl who is pretty on the inside, as the old saying goes.

Adland: 
 

Beagle Street Releases The Pounds, Confuses Adgrunt

This week in London, insurance company Beagle Street decided to "Release the Pounds" in a publicity stunt to promote the finding of its latest survey. £5000 worth of beautiful origami dogs were dispersed across the capital for all and sundry to discover.

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