marketing mishaps

 

Markee the Sad

 

If "grow up Harriet" becomes a meme, blame Protein World

Social media in general and Twitter in particular has become increasingly difficult for brands to find the right tone of voice to use in. It doesn't help either that most people like to use twitter to complain straight to brands, whether they are customers or not, about everything from delayed flights to choice of background color in a brands advertising campaign.

Adland: 
 

Clorox tweets an emoji joke about bleach, stains own reputation

In yet another twitter-incident that is sure to make clients even more wary of ever allowing anything to be said on social media without a few hundred focus groups & meetings watering down any semblance of an idea, Clorox managed somehow to come off as weirdly racist with their recent emoji tweet. Their now deleted tweet read: "New emojis are alright but where's the bleach." and attached was the above emoji-picture where a bottle of Clorox is made up from lipstick stains, pigs, sheep, water drops, paw prints, fish and babies - and curiously the numbers 7 8 9.

Adland: 
 

True Fruits Smoothies non-apology for "ugly girl friend" black bottle smoothie annoys vegans

As we reported earlier, True Fruits smoothies experienced a very negative reaction to the design & text on their black bottle smoothie, but True Fruits refused to apologise for the tone of voice the brand has decided to employ. The black bottle is opaque, because while the blend of fruits in it taste great the mix makes for an unappetizing look, making their usual design of clear bottles an unwise choice.

Adland: 
 

True Fruits Smoothies won't apologize for "ugly girl friend" black bottle smoothie

True Fruits Smoothies in Germany has released a fruit juice mix in a black bottle where there's a point to the oblique design. The smoothie looks unappetizing, but is tasty. So the text on the bottle actually compares this conundrum to an ugly girl who is pretty on the inside, as the old saying goes.

Adland: 
 

Beagle Street Releases The Pounds, Confuses Adgrunt

This week in London, insurance company Beagle Street decided to "Release the Pounds" in a publicity stunt to promote the finding of its latest survey. £5000 worth of beautiful origami dogs were dispersed across the capital for all and sundry to discover.

Badland: 
Adland: 
 

Sainsbury's christmas ad attracts 240 ASA complaints and is Badlanded.

No sooner had the Sainsbury's - 1914 Christmas truce advert been aired, before the Guardian had Ally Fogg calling the ad 'a dangerous and disrespectful masterpiece' in their comment is free section, prompting +1000 comments debating the virtue of using historical events in ads.

Badland: 
Adland: 
 

Adobe simply stands against bullying: you got a problem with that?

Just like Intel, Adobe has now had to clarify their position, and have posted "When anti-bullying efforts backfire" to their blog.

Adland: 
 

Gawker is toxic to brands who partner with them

AdAge finally reports on GamerGate, and Alex Kantrowitz quotes an unnamed advertiser's conclusion about this mess, which much like the slow-motion implosion of Britney Spears mental health that Gawker took such mirth in covering, never seems to end.

"You cannot win. This is a lose-lose situation."

Adland: 
 

Adobe stands against bullying. Are bullied on twitter for it.

Adobe, the creators of creatives favorite tools have sponsored Behance's Bully Project Mural, a social action campaign inspired by the award-winning film BULLY.

Ironically, this is now getting them bullied on twitter.

Adland: 
 

Mercedes pulls advertising from Gawker network.

Yesterday, in the middle of bullying prevention month - see Pacer.org, Stop and Stomp - Sam Biddle of Gawker media cracked a few jokes on twitter.

Adland: 

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