Now entering Dish

Bringing back memories of Halfway named after Half.com in 2000, and the failed attempt of Got Milk, CA in 2002, Dish Network is looking for a town to legally and permanently change it's name to DISH. In return, EchoStar, who owns Dish Network, will give all residents 10 years of free service.

"As part of DISH Network's re-branding efforts and new advertising campaign trumpeting 'Better TV for All,' we invite a city or town to join us by re-branding itself DISH," EchoStar President Michael Neuman said in a statement Tuesday.

The company said that it will accept submissions up until November 1 and that every household within the winning municipality will receive a free DISH Network satellite TV receiver, free standard installation and programming for 10 years.

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A town in Texas, previously known as Clark, has taken DISH up on their offer.

In a deal unanimously approved Tuesday by the two-member town council, Clark agreed to become DISH permanently, effective immediately. It's part of an advertising campaign for Englewood, Colo.-based EchoStar Communications Corp., which operates the DISH Network satellite TV system.
The company pegged the deal at about $4,500 per home in the rural patch of ranch land, which is about a half hour's drive north of Dallas-Fort Worth.
Beyond the lure of free TV service for the 125 residents, the renaming is a way for the town to attract businesses and residents, said Mayor Bill Merritt, who courted EchoStar to pick the town.
"We really look at this as kind of a rebirth for our community," Merritt said. "We want everybody to come here."
The town was founded in June 2000 by L.E. Clark, who sharply criticized the renaming.
"I don't especially like it," said Clark, who lost to Merritt in May's mayoral election. "I worked my butt off a little over a year getting it incorporated."