Just hanging on the cross
This tattoo would hurt, I'm sure.
This baby is a member of baby angels, oh yeah.
Talented toes, I must say. "Foot off"?
Pervert! ;)

The new Pony campaign, a relaunch of Pony in 120 countries, created by fred & farid at Goodby Silverstein in San Francisco shows the star of shoes - contortionist feet!

ad agency: Goodby Silverstein
Commercials: 
Country: 

Comments (18)

  • blabla's picture
    blabla

    The condom one is brilliant. I don't know why.

    Mar 05, 2004
  • caffeinegoddess's picture
    caffeinegoddess

    I saw the baby one in a mag about kids' clothing and marketing. It's a shame they didn't do the foot thing as well with that one. Nice campaign in all though.

    Mar 06, 2004
  • AnonymousCoward's picture
    AnonymousCoward (not verified)

    Again I am stumped. Why would any of these ads make me want to purchase thier shoes is beyond me. I find them vulgar to see and totally irrevelent to the product. Shock value works for younger consumers, but for those of us who do purchase the majority of all product for our home and families this ad would not intice me to support them. Even my 17 yr old daughter is greatly offened by them.

    Mar 07, 2004
  • aiiobo's picture
    aiiobo

    yes I agree they should have done something with the feet of the baby as this one somehow doesn't fit with the rest. Also, I'm a little bugged about the fakeness of the nail in Jesus feet, it has no shadow.

    Mar 08, 2004
  • CopyWhore's picture
    CopyWhore

    Blah, blah, blah Lynette355! These ads are friggin' great. Kudos to the Goodby camp for having the courage to sell these arresting and memorable ads! Shame that the poltroonery of this business prevents more work of this caliber from being produced. And any 17 year old that doesn't find this likeable is most probably autistic! (Or, perhaps, Amish...)

    Mar 08, 2004
  • Robblink's picture
    Robblink

    Nice campaign that breaks through the clutter. Shocking enough to appeal to the teens and artsy enough for the fashion crowd. But I'll always be a Nike man. Their ads are so inspirational, even to non-athletic couch potatoes.

    Mar 09, 2004
  • troymcclure's picture
    troymcclure

    Being a bit harsh with Lynette355 aren't you, CopyWhore? After all, she's entitled to her opinion as much as you are. And while I don't completely agree with her, I'd say she's got a very good point.

    (For what it's worth, the only Pony ad I found personally offensive was the one depicting a crucifixtion - and I'm a lapsed Catholic.)

    Sure, these ads are "different." But is that enough? This seems to be yet another "edgy" and "daring" campaign that seems designed more to impress other creatives than potential customers. It's as if they are more concerned about pushing the envelope than the product itself. Just like those hideous Quizno's commercials. (Don't get me started. . .)

    When I see ads like these, I admire the craftsmanship that went into them. But ultimately they leave me unmoved. They don't give me any product attributes - just attitude. And that's not enough to persuade me to shell out a small fortune on their shoes. People may think the ads are cool and post them on their walls. But will they buy the shoes?

    Maybe they will. Maybe these ads will be a huge success and sales will go through the roof.

    All I know is that Nike does consistently brilliant work and yet they rarely resorts to shock tactics. And they don't seem to be hurting any.

    That's just my opinion. Your mileage may vary.

    Mar 11, 2004
  • blabla's picture
    blabla

    I find that all too often lately I have to repeatedly tell people You are not the target market.. I tell my Male White Middle aged Rich Client that; No, his tastes certainly do not correspond with the tastes of the ethnically diverse teenage girls who are the target market. I tell my Creative Director the same all too often.

    So this isn't directed to Copywhore who likes it, or Lynette who doesn't, or the fella below who doesn't like it either, I just thought I'd pop my head in here and remind everyone; You might not be the one the advertiser is talking too. If you are not, then really, you're not supposed to like it or get it - and it's perfectly fine that you don't. It sounds like Lynette's daughter might be closer to the target market, but for all I know she might be a preppy girl who wouldn't be caught dead in something as bourgeois as sneakers (or: pick any other style of teen) which makes her too: not the target!

    Here's what I see: a very nicely executed (I do love the shots) campaign where the Glam-black-Jesus in Gold sneakers is Crucified , The Boxing-sneakers are actually protective , and the climbing shoes are depicted by a hells angels
    set of climbers toes . Tres edgy! I'm probably reading to much into the images, bottom line, I find the campaign more cryptic than "shocking".. But I must admit, I'm twenty years and comfortable leather shoes away from the target market myself...

    Mar 11, 2004
  • AnonymousCoward's picture
    AnonymousCoward (not verified)

    20-yr-old male w/disposable income sez:

    Great art, subpar advertising. Seriously, Pony should sell posters of these ads. But I don't see why I should buy their shoes when I'm happy with my Skechers.

    Mar 13, 2004
  • anonymous's picture
    anonymous

    Wow, sooooo sexy. These visuals are the Airwalk posters of the 00's. Really nicely done, very sexy shots, attitude and irreverence. I really love it.

    Mar 13, 2004
  • Neo's picture
    Neo

    Sexy, gritty, gorgeous. I'm getting a pair of gold Pony's and hope I can get a poster of that ad to go with them. I'm happily surprised no sour-puss here has objected to the fact that Jesus is black yet.

    Mar 13, 2004
  • Dabitch's picture
    Dabitch

    that links redirects to a search page for me. what should i search on to find that comment?

    Mar 14, 2004
  • adlib's picture
    adlib

    and dudes, these ads are gorgeous!!

    May 15, 2004

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about the author

Dabitch Creative Director, CEO, hell-raising sweetheart and editor of Adland. Globetrotting Swede who has lived and worked in New York, London, San Francisco, Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Stockholm.