Adland's adnews

 
 

Schnappi, das kleine Krokodil

The next super-annoying ring-tone to replace the annoying frog this is the schnappi song sung buy 8-year old Joy Gruttman. The extremly catchy tune about a small crocodile has it's own little webgame as well. Play it here, and download the song, watch the video, etc.
Joy's song even knocked Robbie Williams himself off the charts as her single has already sold over 1 million copies it's claimed. The UK release of the single is planned for August 22nd. For anyone who speaks Swedish the German lyrics are hilarious when little Joy does her breakdown mid-song, "schnipp-schnapp-snopp..." as "snopp" means trouser snake to us. Tee hee heee!

Adland: 
 

British Airways and the Saatchis finally split.

British airways, a client so loyal to the Maurice and Charles that they even left old Saatchi a decade ago when M&C Saatchi was formed to become their first client, have now decided to put the account up for review. M&C Wil be invited to the pitch, which seems to be a money issue rather than the typical "creative differences" one. To Brandrepublic Martin George, commercial director of BA, said:

"However, as the airline continues to face the challenges of an increasingly competitive market, we are required to review all our major contracts across the business in line with our corporate procurement policy. This means that we will review our global advertising to ensure it meets the needs of our changing business and that we manage our worldwide account in the most effective way."
Adland: 
 

No No Hubba Hubba if you ain't got no rubba

Oh my word..... This commercial (windows crappy media only) has an animated rapper chanting "there will be no hubba hubba if you ain't got no rubba" and is part of the New Zealand government paid safe sex campaign.
It' also so bad it feels like a parody. They're kidding right? Never mind that hubba hubba sounds like a pink sweet gum, the whole execution ooozes cheese. Must watch, try not to laugh.

Super adgrunts, quicktime version available here.

Adland: 
 

Ad space for sale on Ebay

... It's become such a common occurance that I'm actually suprised nobody has written some sort of portal or firefox plugin to hunt down the media-space auctions only at Ebay. Any plugin writing wizards feel up to the task? ;)

Adland: 
 

Stretching to the limits for self promotion

Netsummary.dk shares this really bizarre self promotion stunt. Garry Turner sent this in to "One Step Beyond" producer Claire Mandile in the hopes of being featured on the show. We reckon he has a good chance, what do you think?

Adland: 
 

Adidas new campaign centers on impossible game

In Amsterdam 180 has launched their latest Adidas global football ad campaign titled "Impossible Field". It features a mix of players, if course the usual suspect Beckham but also Ballack, Raúl, Defoe, Kaká and Saviola. The campaign will run in all media, posters TV and the web. The TV commercial first aired during the halftime of the 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup, so Europe has already seen it, while the global roll-out wil be heppening in the weeks to come. In the ad the only solid "ground" the players can use is the white lines, everything else is a black void so if you fall of the line you fall off the field!

read more and see the posters in the campaign

Adland: 
 

Honesty is the best policy

Aint this sweet, Claymore went to wonka.com to check out how Nestle was doing with the Golden Ticket promotion, and happened upon a little symbol that said "Ad Buzz" on it.

Curious of course he had to click it, and a little window popped up saying:

Adland: 
 

Kellogg's names cereal after street drug: Coco Rocks.

There are naming agencies out there who check your new name against every conceivable slang or foreign language so that you can avoid stepping in it and choose embarrassing names like the Probe car.
Seems Kellogg's forgot to call them when they began stocking the shelves in the UK with their chocolaty crunchy cereal Coco Rocks. Drug users and those in the know have been snickering at the name ever since the launch earlier this year as Coco Rocks means "dark brown crack cocaine" to them. Oh dear!
Though as any parent will tell you the sugary cereals do seem to have the same addiction rate as crack among kids, buy them once and they never return to sugar-free cereal - so perhaps it's simply truth in advertising after all. ;)

Adland: 
Top